How to Survive the Credit Crunch

July 14, 2009 | Mark Goldstein | Photography Techniques | 1 Comment |
How to Survive the Credit Crunch Image

8) Delve into the realm of social sites and email marketing. When you market your photography through emails, costs can be drastically lower than snail mail, and you can hit thousands of clients on a tight budget. Just remember though, respect client requested to be removed from lists, and be considerate of no-email requests.

New media sources such Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Word Press, MySpace, as well as blogging can also expand your web coverage and bring new business. These websites are the rage with many photographers jumping in, but if you haven't, consider these social sites as potential marketing tools. After my first book came out, I joined a site where people can connect with authors and over a period of a few months, had roughly 2000 people visit my pages. By marketing my book through these sites, I believe I was able to keep it in the top 50 photo books for the first six months of 2009, an incredibly difficult year where sales are down- my publisher was very happy with the numbers, which hopefully will lead to more distribution and sales, as well as future book projects.

How to Survive the Credit Crunch

Just remember, you want to be unique, a bit different from the other million photographers doing the same thing - so pick an agenda or a style and run with it. Blogging about random thoughts not related to photography probably won't get you new work. I personally have a page on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube, and my blog appears on all the top blog sites - which has lead to thousands of hits for my business.

Sure it takes some work to keep these up-to-date, butt pays off in both tangible and intangible ways. This year I sold two gallery prints, made a stock sale, sold a number of copies my exposure book, had a few people sign up for my workshops, did a consultation for a photographer, and landed a big corporate shoot - all through my presence on these sites.

How to Survive the Credit Crunch

9) Create a dream client list: One way to market yourself is to go after a certain type of client you are most interested in, and one that fits the type of work you like to capture. Whether you obtain your list through a mailing list company (Ad Base, Fresh Lists, etc), or simply locate the information online, this exercise can not only help you focus on the type of imagery you want to market, and the type of work you want to do, but could also help you land that dream client you always wanted.  I always said, someone has to shoot for the National Geographic- why can't it be me? By focusing on that top 10 list of clients, you pay more attention to them, may get to know the principals, and since it often about who you know instead of what you can do, you may just land that client.

10) Brainstorm: Often during hard times, people come up with new ways to promote or sell a product or service- this usually occurs simply through brainstorming for better ideas. I've been a photographer more than half my life, but it doesn't mean I've thought of everything- in fact quite the opposite. So remember, you may come up with an idea that saves your business - one that's not even on this list.

Good luck and happy shooting!

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photo, photography, business, survive, recession, economy, credit crunch, prosper

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#1 software developers

Humm… interesting,

i cannot find point 1,2,3

Thanks for writing about it

12:22 pm - Friday, October 9, 2009