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Scanning 35mm Colour Slides With A Dslr


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#1 mountlife

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Posted 04 December 2010 - 02:40 PM

Has anybody tried scanning 35mm colour slides with a DSLR ? If so,what is the quality of the scanned images ?


#2 MarkAClem

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 03:20 PM

QUOTE (mountlife @ Dec 4 2010, 06:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has anybody tried scanning 35mm colour slides with a DSLR ? If so,what is the quality of the scanned images ?


I tried this earlier in the year with my Olympus E-510 + Optek slide scanner attachment. This screws on to the filter threads of a lens and has a translucent matte screen to provide a light source. I ran into several issue using it:
1. The E-510 is a 4:3 aspect ratio and slides are 3:2, so some pixel lost occurs.
2. You will need a zoom lens or a prime which closely matches the slides to avoid more pixel loss.
3. The adapter rotates to align the slide with the sensor and is easy to knock out of alignment whilst changing slides.
4. With a zoom lens, it was easy to accidentally change the zoom with slight movements while inserting slides.
5. The light source needs to be quite bright to get a decent image. Strong outdoor lighting on sunny day works well. I ended up using a 100W incandescent + 33W florescent bulb placed about 1 to 2 feet away to get a good color balance and brightness. This worked well, but gets very warm!

In the end, the results were just OK and required a lot of post-processing. With the lenses I own, I couldn't the slide to completely fill the frame; I ended up cropping much of the image, giving me approximately 5 megapixel effective images. Most of the slides were also slightly rotated in spite of best efforts to keep the adapter aligned.

I finally bought a Wolverine F2D300 (7.2 megapixel) slide scanner from Costco Online. It only has 10-bit color compared to 12-bit, but the slides fill 99% of the image (some slides need very slight cropping) and is easily 10x faster. I have been pleased with the results so far and with over 1500 slides scanned so far, I have been quite happy with it.

#3 Rob Salinger

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 04:52 PM

I was umming and arring over whether to go down the scanner route or re-shoot through a slide gizmo attached to a lens. Eventually opted for the scanner (Scanwit, IIRC).

Purely on a numbers front it made sense - I had several thousand trannies to digitise), but also when I was done I sold the scanner for not much less than I'd paid for it second hand in the first place.

#4 Rodney Maraist

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 02:46 PM

I have hundreds of old slides that I would like to scan. Does anyone have any suggestions on a scanner (inexpensive) that is any good? I know there are some out there for about $200 but I have tried them and they are very slow!!!!



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