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Canon Powershot Sx 220 Hs Image Quality


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#1 avneet

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 02:28 AM

Hi,
I am planning to buy Canon Powershot SX 220 HS. I am getting it for 199 at Jessops. I have heared some good reviews about it. Is there any other camera in similar price range that would give me better image quality. I would be using the camera to capture stills of my kids mostly. Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.


Thanks
Avneet

#2 BOBWED

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 04:30 AM

QUOTE (avneet @ Oct 14 2011, 07:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,
I am planning to buy Canon Powershot SX 220 HS. I am getting it for 199 at Jessops. I have heared some good reviews about it. Is there any other camera in similar price range that would give me better image quality. I would be using the camera to capture stills of my kids mostly. Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.


Thanks
Avneet
Generally Canon sets a very high standard for image quality in point and shoot cameras. And, their line of point and shoots are dependably consistant in that regard. Other manufacturers like Kodak or Nikon have cameras which do well with image quality but, only on a camera by camera basis not as a whole line of cameras. So, it seems to me that when considering image quality by itself Canon is a safe bet. With respect to your individual needs - that is shooting children the sx220 seems an able camera. It is fairly fast, handles low light situations well, has a long zoom, and is well stabilized. So, all this considered as well as image quality makes the sx220 a good choice, seems to me. The one thing I would caution you about though is camera handling. This is a fairly heavy point and shoot camera. Also, I've read that when the flash pops up your ability to securely support the camera with your left hand gets tricky. The reason is this. Normally you hold the left side of the camera with your thumb on the bottom, and the index finger on the top. But, when the flash pops up there's no where to put your index finger on top of the camera. So, it is a tricky camera to hold with the flash up. And, since you are shooting kids I presume you will be doing a lot of indoor photography and using the flash. Since the camera is heavy by point and shoot standards it is unlikely that you will be comfortable holding it only with your right hand while manipulating the zoom lever, shutter button, and selection wheel. So, on paper the camera looks good for your purpose. But, in camera handling it can be a tricky situation. Hope this helps you out. My best, BobWed


#3 avneet

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 01:54 PM

Thanks for your comments BobWed. Yes the handling is a bit tricky with canon sx 2220 hs, the guy at jesspos was in favour of sony cybershot dsc hx7v since both are almost of the same price range. Also sony cybershot dsc hx7v is offering sweet panaroma, background defoucs and gps, I am now a bit confused between the two models. If the picture quality of sony cybershot dsc hx7v is at par with canon sx 220 hs then I will have to go with sony as I dont want large sized prints. Okay now how does the sony cybershot dsc hx7v cope with canon sx 220 hs as far as image quality is concerned keeping in mind that I will be mostly shooting indoors in low light conditions?

Thanks
Avneet

#4 BOBWED

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 03:24 PM

QUOTE (avneet @ Oct 15 2011, 06:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for your comments BobWed. Yes the handling is a bit tricky with canon sx 2220 hs, the guy at jesspos was in favour of sony cybershot dsc hx7v since both are almost of the same price range. Also sony cybershot dsc hx7v is offering sweet panaroma, background defoucs and gps, I am now a bit confused between the two models. If the picture quality of sony cybershot dsc hx7v is at par with canon sx 220 hs then I will have to go with sony as I dont want large sized prints. Okay now how does the sony cybershot dsc hx7v cope with canon sx 220 hs as far as image quality is concerned keeping in mind that I will be mostly shooting indoors in low light conditions?

Thanks
Avneet

Seems to me that your big concern is with image quality. Do you know what the term means? Believe me it is a very broad catagory, and a difficult thing to define. Seems to me what it is and its importance varies. For example, here at PhotographyBlog both cameras have been reviewed and receive very good ratings. So, in that respect the two are equal in this category. But, there are other aspects of it that comes to mind. For example, the Sony in manual mode has only two aperture settings. So this mode is pretty weak. The Canon when shooting with a shutter speed of more than 1 second automatically switches ISO to only 100, which means the camera does not have much faith in its ability to handle higher ISO settings when shooting night captures. Things like this affects image quality for different situations. So, while you are tumbling with image quality you need to define what it is to you and the situations you are most likely to use the camera in.

One thing that I will offer you though. The Canon, as with most of its point and shoot line, offers you the ability to set 'personal' preference settings that apply to auto-program mode shots. This does not apply to full auto mode shoots. These settings allow you to set levels of contrast, saturation, and sharpness. The Sony does not. Which is a chief compliant many p&s shooters have with Sony. These settings allow you to vary the image quality to your preference. But, here's the bug. If you like Sony's preset preference this is no matter.

So, you see? What really counts with respect to image quality is very much a personal preference. You can define your preference with experience as a photographer. This is why I am making the following suggestion. If this is your first camera, forget this camera. Purchase a cheaper camera that gives you similar controls. With that camera you can get experience and enjoy the fun of learning without having spent a lot of money. Take a look at the Canon A3300 or other manufacturer's cameras in this price range. Also, read lots of reviews. Talk to lots of salesmen and photographers. Hold the camera. Play with it. Take your time.

I would like to add my experience to this comment. My first camera was a Fuji s1500. I had studied over buying my camera for 2 months before buying it. At the time it was considered a bridge camera - a camera which bridged between a dslr and a point & shoot. It had all the camera shooting modes: full auto, scene recognition auto, program-auto, 3 manual modes, custom, and video. It had fine image quality. It had a long lens - 12x optical. And, it ran on AA batteries so I could get power easily when my batteries ran out by simple stepping into a store instead of heading home. The purpose of my camera was as a companion to me when I took long walks in the afternoon each day. It would help me "see" and appreciate my surroundings more, and I could bring home what I saw to show my mom who I cared for 7 days a week. On paper it all made sense. Seeing it and holding it at the Shop was fine, too. But, after buying it and using it for awhile I discovered that its size and weight made it difficult to carry on long walks. I could not simply slip it into my pocket. And, there was one other thing. I am partly sighted. So sharpness & clarity is very important to me. I like photos that are sharp and have high contrast. The Fuji has personal settings for saturation and sharpness. But, they are not sensitive enough. There are only two steps in the adjustments. In the Canon line there are 4. I now have a Samsung with 6 steps. This eventually became a very important consideration of mine. But, I learned it only from experience. And, this is why i suggest you start out with a good, but inexpensive camera. Begin with an expensive but disappointing camera, and it will either turn you off altogether (I had a Nikormat slr in the days of film photography which was extremely heavy to carry; and which largely limited me in what I wanted to do with it. So I gave up and used a plastic fixed focus cheapie bought at the dime store.), or it may make it very hard for you to try again in photography and buy another camera. My best to you, and good luck.

Confused? Welcome to the club.

my best, BobWed

#5 avneet

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 04:07 PM

Hi BobWed,
Thanks for your inputs again. Yes to some extent I am confused. Also, I am using canon sx120 is at the moment which is okay. I have read reviews of both the cameras at photographyblog.com. Both the cameras have received good ratings and looking at their sample images seems to have same image quality. Now I understand the term image quality is somewhat difficult to explain all I want is a camera which is good in low light conditions with a decent zoom. I am not a pro and will be using the camera pretty much in auto mode. I have considered canon ixus 220 hs but its only 5x zoom which is not enough.

Thanks
Avneet

#6 BOBWED

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Posted 16 October 2011 - 02:47 AM

QUOTE (avneet @ Oct 15 2011, 09:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi BobWed,
Thanks for your inputs again. Yes to some extent I am confused. Also, I am using canon sx120 is at the moment which is okay. I have read reviews of both the cameras at photographyblog.com. Both the cameras have received good ratings and looking at their sample images seems to have same image quality. Now I understand the term image quality is somewhat difficult to explain all I want is a camera which is good in low light conditions with a decent zoom. I am not a pro and will be using the camera pretty much in auto mode. I have considered canon ixus 220 hs but its only 5x zoom which is not enough.

Thanks
Avneet


Thank you for responding back. I have very much enjoyed the opportunity of this discussion. I would like to continue it further for a moment, if I may. I, too, have the Canon sx120. I think you are comparing your experience with that camera to the new camera you want to buy. What you may be looking for is a solution to the problems the sx120 has. Namely, extremely slow shot to shot speed. Which to you means that it is a very slow camera. Unfortunately, that conclusion is incorret. Please allow me a moment of your time.

I own 5 point and shoot cameras. Each is very different from the other. Consequently, each taught me important lessons. And, that experience I carried to each new camera. The Canon sx120 suffers from slow shot to shot time. It is probably the slowest camera I know of in this regard. And, you equate this to mean that it is a slow camera. Not so. I will explain why. What the sx120 does is this: you press the shutter, the screen goes dark, then for a moment the camera displays the photo it has taken for you to review, then the camera copies this to the sd card, and then the screen lights back up with the scene ready to shoot again. If you do one simple thing this will convert this camera from the slow laggard it is to a blazing speedster. It is very simple: TURN OFF THE REVIEW. The way you do this is to go into the menu system and select REVIEW. Then turn if off. Afterwards, go out and take some photos. You will see it turn into a blazing speedster. Now, read the camera manual that came on the cd. Learn the camera.

It is very important to know your camera. Seems to me you think that all you have to do is take a camera out of its box, insert the sd card and charged battery, and then simply take pictures. That's it. If you do that you are accepting all the default settings of the manufacturer as to how the camera should operate and take pictures. But, often there are problems when simply relying on the camera to do all the thinking. You discern problems in the camera with your brain so it is up to you to use your brain to solve these problems. Seems to me what you are looking for is a camera with a long lens, good image quality, and is fast shot to shot. Well guess what. You now have it. It is the Canon sx120.

You see the problem here is not the camera. The problem is actually you. Go back to the beginning of this discussion. There the issue was image quality. But, later you raise the issue of speed when shooting pictures of your kids. Then it is telephoto capability. So you can see you have a list of issues that now are solved. I have shown you the solution to the slow operation of the sx120. It takes good quality photos. And, it has 10x optical zoom. Now, you needn't buy a camera. But, you are just dying to get that new camera. So, you will buy it anyway. But, you need to be honest with yourself. Otherwise you are going to be going from camera to camera to camera trying to find that perfect camera right out of the box. And, you never will. You could stop here and spend time truly getting to know the sx120. You can stop just using default settings and change it to suit your needs and wishes. Will you? You will have to eventually because in the next camera you will encounter problems there, too. I have very much enjoyed this discussion with you.

If you have trouble with the short battery life of the sx120, I have the solution for that too. But, if you are going to be running away from the problems with this camera instead of learning to deal with them then for me to tell you the solution would be pointless.

My best regards, BobWed

#7 florence101

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 12:17 PM

The only thing I can add is that the HS stands for High Sensitivity and it is a new line for Canon. IS stands, of course for image stabilization.

The HS series cameras are supposed to produce better image quality low light level photo environments. They are a step up with in the SD series.

#8 cyberwolf

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:17 PM

If you are looking for a point and shoot for home use viz for capturing pics of kids still having a nice picture and video quality you must go with Canon IXUS 220 Hs.
Though it offers 5x Zoom but its very handly , slim, attractive and has a nice wide angle of 24mm which appreciable for a poin and shoot of its range.

It also offers nice features like super slow motion and miniature effect.
And Most importantly the flash is build on the front face so the index finger does find a suitable place ( almost tongue.gif )

If u are looking for a handly point and shoot go for Canon IXUS 220.
and If u want a mega zoom cam nikon L120 will do great at your budget. biggrin.gif
-ɟןoʍɹǝqʎɔ



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