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#1 cazmockett

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Posted 02 November 2003 - 09:19 PM

Helloooooo!
Its awfully dark in here, well it would be, being a darkroom!

OK, so I'm probably the only "wet print" worker around so I'll just keep lurking here in case anybody wants to chat about chemicals and stuff like that.

Its been a while since I did any darkroom stuff, but I haven't forgotten how. Just a bit more civilised sitting in front of my PC these days. But not quite the same effect as the "old days" when you'd emerge, blinking into the daylight, stinking of dev and fix, clutching a paw full of freshly dried prints!

</waffle mode>
Caz M

#2 markgoldstein

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Posted 02 November 2003 - 10:05 PM

Hi cazmockett!

Welcome to PhotographyBLOG :-)

I've used the darkroom on occasion as it's a requirement of the photography course that I'm doing here in the UK - I can't say I enjoy it that much though! One small mistake ruins all that hard work...
Mark Goldstein
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#3 collinf

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Posted 03 November 2003 - 08:23 AM

Hi Caz

I've recently bought a complete darkroom setup. We're covering b&w on my City & Guilds course next term so I'm hoping to learn quite a bit there, but knowing there's people here that can help is great!

I have a feeling I'm gonna have to ask a few questions. Our course has (IMHO) too many people and the tutor can't devote enough time to answer the awkward questions.

Glad you're here!

Collin
biggrin.gif
If writers write, how come fingers don't fing?

#4 markgoldstein

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Posted 03 November 2003 - 09:48 AM

How many people are on your course?

We started off with 15 when I did the 6923 course, but by Christmas the total had dropped to 8. Much more room in the darkroom then!

This year for the 6924 course there are about 14 people in the class.
Mark Goldstein
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#5 smslavin

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Posted 03 November 2003 - 03:38 PM

i still wet print. actually it's the only printing i do. i don't do anything digitally yet. there's something about watching a print come to life in the developer that i will always find fascinating.

8)
sean

#6 markgoldstein

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 12:12 PM

I'll agree that it's fascinating, but it's also bloody annoying when you make a mistake and have to start all over again!

If only there was a History menu option biggrin.gif
Mark Goldstein
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#7 collinf

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 12:19 PM

But, eventually, with time and more practice, you'll know when you're starting to go wrong and change it there and then. The old addage is certainly true:

Practice makes perfect.

Of course, you could have a perfect print, but it's not what you want. Is that a mistake or a practice run? wink.gif
If writers write, how come fingers don't fing?

#8 markgoldstein

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 12:50 PM

I guess I was thinking more of those annoying little things, like dust spots and wonky borders...The things that you don't notice until the print is in the fixer!
Mark Goldstein
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#9 smslavin

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 03:25 PM

spotting pens are your friend. biggrin.gif borders usually aren't a problem for me since i always print borderless.

8)
sean

#10 markgoldstein

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 03:29 PM

spotting pens - I've heard rumours that they exist! :-)

We had to do borders on our prints last year, and were marked on them as part of the overall presentation. There's a definite knack to doing them.
Mark Goldstein
Editor, PhotographyBLOG

#11 tilly

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Posted 02 December 2003 - 06:20 PM

we have a darkroom at school (im feeling kinda young here!) For my last project i used it alot, and really really enjoyed it. I was dodging in parts of one negative over another one to create a series of self-portraits where i was only party visible. it was kinda tricky, but i still find darkroom developing so much more rewarding than any other kind. it has unique charm to it, and its just so satisfying when it comes out really good......

#12 Guest_shutterbabe_*

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 02:25 AM

So nice to see that I am not the only person who loves the darkroom. I enjoy it so much more than digital photography, I find it very relaxing to work in the dark.

#13 moeyer

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 01:06 PM

glad to see there are a few people into darkroom stuff. ive resently been fully convered back to the darkroom fold after a short spell with digital last year at college, theres nothin more satisfying than watching a print appear or stumbling around in the pitch black of a colour darkroom for 4 hours and producing a print ur very happy with. also my student house next year has a cellar with blocked windows, very dark, i think i can heard a home darkroom calling me.

moeyer

#14 FiZZ

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 09:52 AM

Digital sucks!

=P

The leeway and forgiveness of a negative is so much more than digital. If you have a shot that is underexposed by 4 or 5 stops, or is too gray and a tad dark, the enlarger will forgive you and let you print with beautiful contrast and exposure.

You try doing that in Photoshop and see how it screws up your image!

However, my favorite workflow is developing black and white film by myself (I don't trust film stores for some reason), and using the negative scanner. Allows for easier sharing and distribution online.

Special requests and prints get a few hours with my music and I, and my beautiful Ilford Pearl 8x10 paper.

=( I miss the smell of developer in the morning.

#15 lelele

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:21 AM

Very happy to be here to see these, these messages very helpful to me, thank you landlord.





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