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Darkroom Techniques


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#1 FiZZ

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 09:57 AM

So who here still uses the darkroom?

I graduated from college so I don't have access to it as frequently as I want to.

I do remember achieving Solarization, after spending 15 hours trying to figure out how to do it. I would just get gray prints, but now I know!!!

Anyone still does techniques in the darkroom? Sepia toning? Cyanotype printing? Anyone?

#2 princemkhan

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 07:40 AM

A darkroom is a specialized light free environment designed for artists who work in the medium of photography. In order to develop film and prints, artists need to work in darkness to avoid exposing the light sensitive emulsions which cover photographic paper and film before they are developed. A darkroom can vary widely in size and design, depending on the type of materials being worked with in the darkroom and the number of artists sharing it. Often, artists work together in the same darkroom to share the costs of photography.
A very basic darkroom usually has an enlarger for making prints, along with an assortment of developing chemicals in separate tubs. To develop prints, the artist exposes photo-sensitive enlarging paper to light through an enlarger, and then dunks the photograph in a series of developing chemicals to bring out the latent image.

#3 watson229

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 05:09 AM

A darkroom is a specialized term as the name suggests a light less environment designed for artists who work as a photographers. Darkroom is used to develop the prints of the negative films to avoid exposing the light sensitive emulsions which cover photographic paper and film before they are developed. Photographers or others who work for washing the negatives use this dark room.A darkroom can vary widely in size and design, depending on the type of materials being worked with in the darkroom and the number of artists sharing it. Often, artists work together in the same darkroom to share the costs of photography.
A very basic darkroom usually has an enlarger for making prints, along with an assortment of developing chemicals in separate tubs. To develop prints, the artist exposes photo-sensitive enlarging paper to light through an enlarger, and then dunks the photograph in a series of developing chemicals to bring out the latent image.



#4 Sire

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:07 PM

When printing in the darkroom, you may notice areas of the photograph are not consistent with the tones of the image and are too bright or too dark. Commonly, this may include bright skies that appear washed out or dark shadows that show no detail.

#5 Loie

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 01:01 AM

QUOTE (FiZZ @ Sep 30 2007, 01:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So who here still uses the darkroom?

I graduated from college so I don't have access to it as frequently as I want to.

I do remember achieving Solarization, after spending 15 hours trying to figure out how to do it. I would just get gray prints, but now I know!!!

Anyone still does techniques in the darkroom? Sepia toning? Cyanotype printing? Anyone?


I still have extensive darkroom equipment...the papers I used aren't available anymore...not sure if I will set it up again, but can't seem to part with it.


#6 maxnardi

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:04 PM

Hi,

anyone can suggest me your preffered film/develop combination for B&W and specify why?

I'm interested in fashion prinst a la Avedon ... (shot apart obviously y can't compare to the master... smile.gif )

#7 christinaroberts

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 05:51 AM

A darkroom is a room that can be made completely dark to allow the processing of light sensitive photographic materials and including photographic film. It can vary widely in size and design, depending on the type of materials being worked with in the darkroom and the number of artists sharing it. Often, artists work together in the same darkroom to share the costs of photography.


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