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Lighting Question


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#1 nickelb

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 03:21 PM

Question?

In a large poorly lighted room how would you increase detail in the background if your subject matter was less than 10 feet away and the only equipment you had were a camera and a handheld electronic strobe?

Thanks in advance.

#2 Andrea NC

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 03:49 PM

QUOTE (nickelb @ Oct 30 2007, 11:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Question?

In a large poorly lighted room how would you increase detail in the background if your subject matter was less than 10 feet away and the only equipment you had were a camera and a handheld electronic strobe?

Thanks in advance.




I feel like a robot... "Need more input, please!" LOL. Seriously, a lot of this depends on what you are shooting. And define "poorly lighted," i.e., dim, nearly dark, florescent lights, etc. Theoretically, opening the F-stop of your lens wider (cannot say exactly, because everything is relative) should give you greater depth of field, therefore bringing your background into greater clarity. Are you shooting digital or film?

What exactly is it that you are shooting?

#3 FiZZ

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 05:57 AM

QUOTE (Andrea NC @ Oct 30 2007, 07:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (nickelb @ Oct 30 2007, 11:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Question?

In a large poorly lighted room how would you increase detail in the background if your subject matter was less than 10 feet away and the only equipment you had were a camera and a handheld electronic strobe?

Thanks in advance.




I feel like a robot... "Need more input, please!" LOL. Seriously, a lot of this depends on what you are shooting. And define "poorly lighted," i.e., dim, nearly dark, florescent lights, etc. Theoretically, opening the F-stop of your lens wider (cannot say exactly, because everything is relative) should give you greater depth of field, therefore bringing your background into greater clarity. Are you shooting digital or film?

What exactly is it that you are shooting?


First advice I would give is use MORE REFLECTORS.

Get anything reflective, aluminum foil, mirror, car shade, white card, whatever, and use it to light your seen. With one strobe and enough reflectors you can change the quality of the light.

As for your question, need more input as well.

From what I understood, you have a subject in front of you, and your light source isn't strong, and you are asking how you can get more detail from the background.

That just sounds like asking for better exposure. The method I described increases the amount of light in the scene, by as much as two or three stops. That should help you get more detail.




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