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Archiving Prints


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#1 ppitx

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Posted 01 November 2004 - 02:27 PM

I have stored my prints in plastic sleeves purchased from a local office supply store. The problem is that the prints stick to the plastic. Anyone have a solution?

#2 simon162

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 12:35 PM

Hello,

Iam from Pressmart, media service company and we offer digital publishing and archiving solutions to publications.

If you are Looking to transform documents into intelligent content to reach global audience then try pressmart.net

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Looking forward to discuss with me.

#3 simon162

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 08:23 AM

We integrate the publishing systems and let the news reporters and editors write, edit, publish to print and Web editions, and archive all at once.

#4 simon162

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:46 AM

We put photos, email, historical documents, video files, and other important resources into digital format, then organizing them effectively; you can make these items available to anyone with a Web browser. At any time, from anywhere with no fear of damage.

With the technologies available to scan, organize, and manage digital media archives, your institution can make valuable items, now available in digital form, available to library users, researchers, or anyone.

#5 SmileyJohn

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Posted 07 May 2008 - 02:49 PM

You need to allow the prints to dry out fully before putting them into protective covers. There is a useful article on Photo Paper and printer ink here which explains why the ink needs to dry out fully. If you put the picture into a frame or plastic wallet before it has dried you will get 'misting' and it will likely stick to the plastic and be very difficult to remove later

#6 Tim Martin

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Posted 09 May 2008 - 05:16 AM

I just now saw this thread in the forums. I did an internship last semester for digital archiving of older prints, negatives and glass plates. The easiest and best way to archive prints is to set up a light table on an easel. In place of the enlarger, use a camera with a macro lens. Light the table evenly (check with a hand-held light meter) and make sure the camera and table top are parallel. Just take a photo of the photo in RAW format, convert it to DNG and burn all of your files to archival discs.

If you don't want to make a digital archive there is always the option of acid-free envelopes. The acids in normal envelopes will slowly fade and eat away at the paper and inks used for your original prints. There are a couple of places online that sell archival envelopes but they are rather expensive.

Tim



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