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#1 Noddy

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 08:52 PM

I am going to give slide film a go.
Can anyone recommend a forgiving slide film??

#2 Guest_Dave Q_*

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE (Noddy @ Nov 16 2005, 08:52 PM)
I am going to give slide film a go.
Can anyone recommend a forgiving slide film??



Slide films never were forgiving, your exposure latitude is usually only 1/3rd stop either side of correct. Kodak Ektachrome was fairly easy going.

#3 jmc

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 10:16 AM

Try the new Fuji Velvia 100 Professional.

#4 Paul_77

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:14 PM

Good choice, for quality you can't beat slide film. No grain because it uses a dye emulsion, but as Dave said it is very unforgiving when it comes to exposure latitude.

If you know your camera well, and have shot a lot of negative exposures with it, you shouldn't have too much trouble switching over. Just remember, the final exposure effect you want must be achieved when you shoot the photo., it cannot be changed much at all at printing time.

But ah, the satisfaction of the rich colours and smooth sharp and detailed result you get when printing from slides, especially large prints. It will make you wonder why you ever bothered using negatives.

#5 Chuckiesinluv

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Posted 21 March 2006 - 11:42 PM

biggrin.gif [b][size=5][quote name='Noddy' date='Nov 16 2005, 08:52 PM' post='2580']
I am going to give slide film a go.
Can anyone recommend a forgiving slide film??



For Gosh sakes! I have shot 100's of rolls of slide film. With todays's modern SLR, almost any make, You will really have to try hard not to get a great image.
Why not try the oldest and most enduring film of all. Kodachrome 64. Your Walmart Store can process it-actually they send it off to DWAYNE'S PHOTO ( on web)
As a second choice PROVIA pROFESSIONAL with Fuji Processing mailers.
Third Choice is Velvia 50 by Fuji with Fuji Mailers.


Ektachrome is okay-but dull compared to Provia or Velvia. What kind of camera do you have. One thing I encourage is Tripod and cable release for slides. Currently I have over 17000 slides-mostly Kodachrome 64.
Check out film dealer B&H in New York City. Ask for Bill.

#6 Mark Andreani

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 05:44 AM

There is only one choice, for years the standard stock used at Nationl Geographic.... Kodachrome 64. If you want 'realistic' colour, go with any of the low ISO Fujis (my personal preference); if you want shots that ooze atmosphere are perfect for people photography, you don't need anything more than Kodachrome. Mark Andreani www.markandreani.com

#7 Tsavo

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 07:48 PM

Noddy

Anyone who shoots slide film will tell you that that anyone who recomends a film off pat is talking poo.

Chromes are not forgiving, consequently each film has a subtle characteristic which orientates it towards one purpose or another.
Fuji velvia would be a disaster for someone with little experience if used to photograph people, likewise Kodak Ektachrome 100VS. Equally, Kodachrome 64 is a disaster for low dawn wildlife shots.

So to answer your question: What are you taking pictures of?

Some tips that are subject to opinion,

For a great starting point: reasonably accurate skin tones and saturated colours Fuji Astia 100F . The Same goes with Kodak Ektachrome 100GX slightly warmer

For wildlife thats moving Kodak Ektachrome 200 rated as ISO 400 or Fuji Provia 400F (cooler)

I have only suggested Kodak and Fuji films as they are reasonably available, although I had a fruitless search for them today instores, going to have to go online.

Regardless of what you do, when you get your slides back, buy, beg or borrow a slide projector, open a decent bottle of wine and sit yourself down in front of a 4ft by 6ft image and go through each shot for several minutes, study them carefully, because the time spent pouring over your slides is what photography is all about.

Then buy another role of film, shoot that and when you get the hang of it, envite some friends around.


Cheers

#8 seocw

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 08:29 PM

I am learning by reading all these cool stuffs. I need to learn more for sure from here from the professionals

#9 salik

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 10:13 AM

It actually depends on the surrounding in which you going to shoot.. so beware of the night mode effects also..






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#10 seocw

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 12:58 PM

This one is good... you can try it.

QUOTE (jmc @ Dec 28 2005, 11:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Try the new Fuji Velvia 100 Professional.





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