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Hamon
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Hamon



Something different! This shows the detail of a Japanese sword blade (Wakizachi)dating from the end of the Edo period, about 1660.The pattern along the blade edge is formed during the tempering stage and is known as the Hamon.
Don't really expect many people to find much interest in this, just doing it for my own amusement really!


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McKenzie



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Registered: April 2006
Location: m
Posts: 6,574
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8.5
Date: Sat October 21, 2006
Views: 2,285
Filesize: 408.6kb
Dimensions: 800 x 610
Keywords: hamon
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stewart
Interesting shot Steve. I've seen Kill Bill, so I like it! Smile
Potential for quite a few interesting shots, I would have thought.
You can find me online at:
cargocollective.com/stewartbywater
stewart.aminus3.com
altphotos - a forum for creative photography
#1 Sat October 21, 2006 10:29pm

Nigel C Young
I find it of great interest. I like the forged patterns in iron-age British blades and find their manufacture fascinating.
Nigel.
#2 Sat October 21, 2006 10:31pm

smw57
Thanks Stewart, I think there well be a few more in the pipeline. Believe it or not this was VERY difficult, the lighting was a nightmare, the blades are supposed to best viewed with the light of a candle from behind, nightmare! LOL Cheers for the comment mate! Smile
>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#3 Sat October 21, 2006 10:34pm

stewart
I thought it might have been. I suppose that those things must be very reflective. Good result though. - Well worth the effort in my opinion! Smile
You can find me online at:
cargocollective.com/stewartbywater
stewart.aminus3.com
altphotos - a forum for creative photography
#4 Sat October 21, 2006 10:36pm

smw57
Thanks Nigel, the Japanese blades are in a whole differnt league, the iron is folded around 15 times and results in more than 32,000 layers of lamination, and there is usualy a softer grade core in the centre! Impessive huh!
>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#5 Sat October 21, 2006 10:36pm

stewart
I hope you don't use it Steve! Smile
You can find me online at:
cargocollective.com/stewartbywater
stewart.aminus3.com
altphotos - a forum for creative photography
#6 Sat October 21, 2006 10:38pm

smw57
Well Stewart, I have used them for Iai-do and have done Kendo and Karate so I have come face to face with a few blades, it is a very sobering experience! LOL
>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#7 Sat October 21, 2006 10:48pm

stewart
Hope you didn't lose anything that you need! Smile I used to do Karate and Judo, but I learned just enough to get myself into more danger! Wink Mercifully, I have never been face to face with one of those! Smile
You can find me online at:
cargocollective.com/stewartbywater
stewart.aminus3.com
altphotos - a forum for creative photography
#8 Sat October 21, 2006 10:58pm

pacificphoto
I used to do martial arts training, too. So we find out yet another common thread amongst the bloggers. We're not only alchies who love fungus, but we're warriors at heart. Wink This picture is interesting, but the explanation helps make it more so. Until I read more, I thought it was a piece of wood, which is just the opposite of its true nature. Perhaps further shots could concentrate more on specularity (metalic reflection of light).


Do you follow the old tradition that if the blade leaves its scabbard, it must taste blood?


--Chris
#9 Sun October 22, 2006 1:29am

smw57
Thanks for the comment Chris.It was intersting to read that you thought it was a piece of wood,the surface of the blade displays 'grain' called Hada in Japanese, this is the result of the folding pocess used during the forging of the blade this 'grain' can be either plain or intricate.
I will try and get a shot of the Nie and Noi (coarse and fine crystaline structure within the temper line or Hamon)


I don't follow the blood theory, that is a fallacy but I have managed to cut myself once when stripping a blade for cleaning! LOL



>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#10 Sun October 22, 2006 7:28am

Bridget
Interesting shot Steve,but i had to comment back to Chris also.Less of the alchies please some of us are tee-total,fungus i will go with.Nikon i can understand but that brown liquid that sends most men back to childhood in a matter of hours sobers me Smile Smile Smile.Lets see some more shots Steve.
#11 Sun October 22, 2006 7:43am

smw57
Morning Bridget, hope all is well with you, mixing drink and Japanese swords it not advisable...so I am with you on that one! LOL
>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#12 Sun October 22, 2006 7:47am

Bridget
Morning Steve,alls well.I am down your way on Wednesday picking H up for 2weeks can't wait.I'm sure i may regret those words lol.
#13 Sun October 22, 2006 8:05am

Anvica
Very intesting! ... Japanese... English blades, well ok, but don't forget the Toledo blades. Wink Ana
Ana

My gallery
Fotograf@s de Zaragoza
#14 Sun October 22, 2006 9:22am

smw57
Thank you Anvica, toledo blades were indeed very fine! LOL Smile
>Steve
You don't take a photograph, you make it. - Ansel Adams
#15 Sun October 22, 2006 12:02pm


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