100 Faces of London

March 18, 2011 | Zoltan Arva-Toth | Photographers | 7 Comments |
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Milan Svanderlik’s ‘100 Faces of London’ photography project celebrates the diversity of the UK’s capital city. He first embarked on the project in early 2010, inspired by London’s mix of traditions, cultures and habits, and the faiths, expectations and hopes of its inhabitants. The first stage involved the photographing of one hundred Londoners aged 20 to 100, representing a broad range of ethnic groups. In the second stage, the photographs were printed out using an Epson Stylus Pro 3880 large-format printer and Epson UltraChrome K3 inks on Cold Press Natural paper for a unique ‘Heritage Book’ that weighs 35lbs. Milan is currently exploring suitable spaces in one of London’s galleries or public exhibition areas to mount an exhibition. Meanwhile you can view the photos at the project’s website.

Website: 100 Faces of London

Epson Press Release

Epson supports ‘100 Faces of London’ to bring the capital’s diversity alive in photos

Photography project explores modern day London through one hundred portraits of ordinary Londoners

18 March 2011 – One hundred portraits of ordinary Londoners representing the diversity of the UK’s capital city make up the ‘Heritage Book’ of photographic plates, the culmination of photographer Milan Svanderlik’s ‘100 Faces of London’ project supported by leading technology solutions company, Epson.

Milan first embarked on his ‘100 Faces of London’ photography project in early 2010, inspired by London’s mix of traditions, cultures and habits, and the faiths, expectations and hopes of its inhabitants.  Milan found in London a city of extraordinary, perhaps unique, diversity that he has worked to capture in the appearance of one hundred sitters, all ordinary Londoners photographed over a twelve-month period.

Project creator Milan Svanderlik, who was born in Northern Bohemia and has adopted London as his home city, comments: “London is truly an extraordinary place and the thing that makes it most extraordinary is the people who have been drawn here and who have made their home in the capital.”

The sitters – all volunteers – ranged from 20 to 100 years in age, and every effort was made to embrace a broad range of ethnic backgrounds. From the outset, the aim was to feature ordinary yet real faces instead of familiar personalities. The choice of formal, studio portraiture was deliberate, but Milan was careful to avoid influencing the sitters’ dress or self-expression during the shoots, as the portraits were designed to be an honest portrayal of the personality and richness of one hundred Londoners who collectively illustrate the capital’s multicultural face.

Once the photography was completed, Milan said that “not one of the sitters, any of whom might have been seen in the capital’s streets, parks or theatre foyers, could have been accurately described as an ‘ordinary Londoner’;  they all proved to be quite extraordinary personalities.”

Epson helped to bring London’s diverse faces and personalities to life in photographs, supporting the printing of stage two of the project – the ‘Heritage Book’ – on the Epson Stylus Pro 3880. Using this professional A2+ Epson printer together with Epson UltraChrome K3 with Vivid Magenta inks and Epson Cold Press Natural paper, Milan has been able to print high-quality and long lasting prints of all one hundred portraits for the production of the ‘Heritage Book’.

Milan is currently exploring suitable spaces in one of London’s galleries or public exhibition areas to mount an exhibition of ‘100 Faces of London’ during 2012, the year of the Cultural Olympiad. The ‘100 Faces of London’ creator also plans to present the ‘Heritage Book’ to one of London’s major collections to be retained for posterity.

‘100 Faces of London’ website: http://www.100facesoflondon.org



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#1 Digital Photography Dept.

This is a great project. A few months ago I ordered the book "Seattle 100" by photographer Chase Jarvis. To read about 100 inspiring people all in one book was amazing. These type of projects are inspiring.

9:56 pm - Saturday, March 19, 2011

#2 David Greene

More celebrating "diveristy" nonsense eh? More like celebrating the ethnic cleansing of the indigenous British.

I note that Milan Svanderlik doesn't sound like a very British name so why should he care?

11:35 am - Monday, March 21, 2011

#3 Milan Svanderlik

I am sure we would all agree that David Greene has every right to express his views but I suspect he did not bother to look at the photographs of 100 Londoners nor read the associated text. I am however shocked and appalled that my artistic project should be seen as “celebrating the ethnic cleansing of the indigenous British”.

David, as an artist and photographer, I observe every day the wonderful people who make up this amazing city of ours. It is like admiring a stunning English garden, full of the most beautiful trees, plants and flowers that have been brought here from all corners of the world. The alternative, the never-ending fields of monoculture, seem so dull and unappealing in comparison.

Of course, you may believe that simply having a foreign name, like me, is enough to label anyone as not caring about London or about Britain; how sadly prejudiced you must be.

2:14 pm - Tuesday, March 22, 2011

#4 David Greene

Well done Milan Svanderlik. Spoken like a true mentally-ill white liberal who follows the meta-religion of "political correctness". Carry on celebrating the ethnic cleansing of the British from Britain.

6:49 pm - Tuesday, March 22, 2011

#5 Hal

Mr Green, maybe you will just have to face the fact that not everyone reads the Daily Mail. Not everyone is scared of 'the different'. In fact, us people from the big city, (London, in this case) wouldn't want a dull pale uniform society with only one look, one colour, one language and only one culture.

Maybe you're in the wrong country though Mr Greene. According to your criteria the entire English Royal Family would need to leave this country too. I mean, where would they fit in with a name like "Saxe-Coburg and Gotha" (called Herzogtum Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha before WW1) with their German-Greek background.

Think about that the next time you and your EDL-friends proudly wave the flag of St. George (who, incidentally was Palestinian).

If you should be that keen on a uniform white society, I suggest you try several smaller Swiss or Austrian villages.

Be aware though that they, as the snobs they are, might not warm to you. These countries in particular pride themselves of being educated and would look down on Englishman who cannot even spell a simple word like 'diversity'.

7:39 pm - Tuesday, March 22, 2011

#6 David Greene

So tell me Hal, what would you think if Japan was to be slated for the multi-cultural social engineering (AKA race-replacement) that Britain has been?

Japanese taxpayers money used to flood Japan with hundreds of thousands of Africans and Indians and Pakistani's and whoever else in order to displace the indigenous population?

Would you whole-heartedly support that?

11:18 pm - Tuesday, March 22, 2011

#7 clipmask

Good luck

7:51 pm - Sunday, March 27, 2011