Compact Camera of the Year 2013

January 17, 2014 | Mark Goldstein | Digital Compact Cameras, PhotographyBLOG | 14 Comments |
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This week we’re revealing our favourite products from last year in our annual awards, looking back at the essential photography kit that helped to define 2013.

The Compact Camera of the Year 2013 award goes to the Fujifilm X20.

“...the Fujifilm X20 delivers such a winning combination of old and new that offers so many important improvements over the original model that we can heartily recommend it for new and X10 users alike.”

Read the Full Review

Congratulations to Fujifilm and the FinePix X20!



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#1 Oleg

hi,
Why not Sony rx100II?

Thanks
Oleg

12:39 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#2 vattenskada

very informative review .well written dear sir..

3:43 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#3 Yaj

@O:


The Sony's lens can't really match this specification when zoomed: 4x, 28-112mm, f/2.0-2.8. That limitation could be a big part of the reason.

4:15 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#4 martin

I tested both units and I bought the RX100. The images produced by this camera are better quality than the X20.

Images of X20 are quickly smoothed from 800 iso and more.

7:54 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#5 Yaj

Martin:

Was that the RX100 you bought, that's a 2012 camera?


Then were you shooting raw, and what raw extraction software were you using?

Last: You don't shoot with that RX100 zoomed out much then, right?

9:56 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#6 martin

Yaj:

"Was that the RX100 you bought, that's a 2012 camera?"

I bought my RX100 this summer (2013). It was the version RX100 MKI.

"Then were you shooting raw, and what raw extraction software were you using?"

I rarely photograph in raw. Jpeg generated by the device are excelents. I tried the raw, but I noticed no difference. The software that I used for my tests in raw was Lightroom.

"You don't shoot with that RX100 zoomed out much then, right?"


Right.


10:59 pm - Friday, January 17, 2014

#7 Yaj

Martin:

The Sony RX100 remains a 2012 camera even if you purchased it new in 2013, therefore it is ineligible for the best of 2013 award.


Generally it's not a great idea to make image quality claims about raw capable cameras based on jpegs. Jpeg quality claims are a different matter.

The fact that the Fuji's zoom is so much faster when fully zoomed out is a big deal, and would be a significant reason to buy the Fuji over the Sony RX100 or RX100II. Though I bet the Sonys do better video.

12:56 am - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#8 martin

"The Sony RX100 remains a 2012 camera even if you purchased it new in 2013, therefore it is ineligible for the best of 2013 award."

You are right, but you have the RX100 MKII, this version is released in 2013.

The worst is the important smoothing and the noise that occurs too early in my opinion, Raw offered no better results.

But you have the right to choose the device you want. It was only my opoinion, and I know that fuji makes good units too.



1:31 am - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#9 Yaj

martin:

What raw extraction software did you use for either camera?


And yes both the RX100 and the RX100II are better high ISO cameras than the Fuji X20, but the RX100 (both) make higher ISOs necessary when zoomed.

1:20 pm - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#10 martin

I used Lightroom 4.

3:11 pm - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#11 Yaj

M-

Try LightRoom5, that variation does the Fuji XTRans raws better--particularly green foliage.

CaptureOne and PhotoNinja (both easy enough to use as trialware) also extract the raws from Fuji X cameras better than ACR 7, which is what LR4 uses.

5:21 pm - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#12 martin

Thank you for the idea, but I do not have the X20. I traded for the RX100. I could not afford both device. They were too expensive.

6:22 pm - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#13 Yaj

m--

Well, I imagine that you have raws from the Fuji X20, so if you feel like trying out either the latest CaptureOne or PhotoNinja, they'd both free to try for at least a couple of weeks. So it's just download and install time, and PhotoNinja takes an activation code.

PhotoNinja in fact remains active after the trial period ends, but there's no more saving/exporting. (No I don't work for PictureCode.)

Anyhow yes, when the lens is wide open, the Sony RX100 is an excellent camera.

8:57 pm - Saturday, January 18, 2014

#14 samantiti

yep!
people were talking about IQ of RX100 over x20 should know IQ isn't everything. x20 has OVF! for getting composition in the way of art of photography so don't even think of getting a CAMERA without OVF. i cant do that.

11:51 am - Wednesday, February 5, 2014