From the Boundary’s Edge

November 7, 2011 | Zoltan Arva-Toth | Books | 2 Comments |
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From the Boundary’s Edge is a new coffee-table book featuring images captured by award-winning sports photographer Laurence Griffiths. Described as a “glorious celebration of village cricket”, the book is filled with photos of anonymous village and club cricketers; tea ladies, spectators, scorers, kids playing cricket on the beach, and more. Published by Atlantic Publishing, the book is available now for £25.

Atlantic Press Release

From the Boundary’s Edge
by Laurence Griffiths
with Foreword by David Lloyd

Cricket, to most people, is as quintessentially English as afternoon tea and discussions about the weather.

Award-winning sports photographer, Laurence Griffiths (Sports Photographer of the Year 2011), is a cricket nut and in his day-job he often finds himself capturing images of the professional cricketing elite - the flashing blade of KP; Jimmy Anderson in full menacing stride; Andrew Strauss taking a blinding slip catch; or Graeme Swann clean bowling the world’s finest. But here in this magnificent, coffee-table book, ‘From the Boundary’s Edge’, he indulges his passion for the other side of the game by training his viewfinder on local club cricket and village green matches up and down the land.

Griffiths’ photographs capture completely the spirit of the English village game; from the ladies making the teas at Belvoir in Leicestershire to the bats being handmade in East Hanningfield; from the children in their school uniforms at Thurgarton to the kids playing cricket on the beach at South Sands in Devon; they are all here, the players, the umpires, the tea ladies, the spectators and the scorers, while Griffiths’ simple yet beautiful shots of impromptu beach matches testify to the fact that you don’t need 22 players, whites, an umpire - or even grass - to enjoy a game of cricket.

“Laurence has demonstrated why he is pre-eminent among sports photographers. Swapping the big-name venues for the amateur backwaters, he shows that the great cricketing tradition is flourishing throughout the land - that the pictures themselves make you want to get out and turn your arm or wield the willow”. David (Bumble) Lloyd.

The pictures in this book of the anonymous village and club cricketers batting, bowling, or just looking for lost balls, remind us that not all sport is played in the giant stadiums of the professionals and that some of the game’s finest moments are experienced on village greens, in parks and on beaches everywhere. This book will make you wish that you could be at every ground and could have played in or watched every game Laurence Griffiths has photographed.

David Lloyd again, “this book is not only a visual feast, it is a sensory smorgasbord, conjuring up the sights, sounds and smells of a British summer. This magnificent volume is a glorious celebration of cricket, captured in all its majesty by the expert eye of one who shares my abiding passion for the king of games”.

From the Boundary’s Edge by Laurence Griffiths
With Foreword by David Lloyd
Published by:  Atlantic Publishing
Publication date:  November 2011
Price:  £25
Jacketed hardback
ISBN:  9780955794971
Available from all good bookshops



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#1 Fran

Hi

More information on the website at http://www.boundarysedge.co.uk

Fran

1:15 pm - Wednesday, November 9, 2011

#2 Jouster

You know what's so great about cricket? Yes, it absolutely *is* quintessentially English. But it's also quintessentially Australian: cork hats and a young Bradman hitting sixes with a broomstick in the bush; it's quintessentially West Indian: grilled chicken, steel drums and lethal fast bowling; it's quintessentially Indian: kites wheeling overhead as 100,000 watch an ODI. It's part of the history and culture of New Zealand and South Africa too. Kids in New Zealand and Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have their idols too. Cricket is a game with soccer's global reach but without its increasing homogeneity. And it all sprang from that village game. What a wonderful sport.

1:44 pm - Friday, November 18, 2011