Fujifilm X-S1

November 24, 2011 | Zoltan Arva-Toth | Digital Compact Cameras | 26 Comments |
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The Fujifilm X-S1 is a new bridge camera with a 2/3”-type 12-megapixel EXR CMOS sensor and a 24-624mm equivalent Fujinon zoom lens. Optically, the lens comprises 17 glass elements, including four aspherical elements and two ED lenses, a nine-bladed diaphragm and a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at the wide end of the zoom range. In standard mode, the lens focuses down to 30cm, but by selecting Super Macro Mode, users can focus down to 1cm. Additionally, the Fujifilm X-S1 features the same 2/3-inch 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor as the X10 (read review), Coupled to the EXR CMOS sensor is the high speed EXR processor, which offers a minimal shutter lag of just 0.01sec and a high speed continuous shooting capability of 7fps at full resolution or 10fps at six-megapixel resolution. The 0.47-inch EVF features 1.44 million pixels for clarity and has a wide viewing area of 26 degrees to reduce eye strain. The camera also features a tiltable rear monitor, manual exposure controls and raw image capture. Launched in February 2012, in the UK, the X-S1 will have an estimated selling price of £699.

Fujifilm Press Release

Fujifilm X-S1: The bridge camera, reinvented

The Fujifilm X series of premium cameras has a third model – the X-S1, due to be launched in the UK in February 2012 – and just like the two before it, this latest addition sets new standards in design and performance.

The X-S1 represents a new breed of bridge cameras. Built in Japan to exacting standards, the body has a high-quality look and feel with metal dials, a rubberised coating and superior handling characteristics that will appeal to the discerning photo enthusiast.

In addition, the X-S1 offers a premium picture-taking performance to match its looks. From the high-quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens through to the EXR sensor taken from the X10 and the wide range of functions, the X-S1 puts the photographer in complete control.

Maximum optical versatility
The centrepiece of the X-S1 is the Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens. Offering a range of 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) it caters perfectly for every photographic need and features a bright f/2.8 maximum aperture at the wide-angle setting.

This optical range is boosted further by Fujifilm’s Intelligent Digital Zoom capability, which effectively doubles the focal range without the drop in picture quality normally associated with digital zoom functions. As a result, the X-S1 offers users an incredible 52x zoom range of 24-1248mm (35mm equivalent).

Optically, the lens comprises 17 glass elements, which includes four aspherical elements and two ED lenses, to deliver images with superb edge-to-edge sharpness and amazing clarity. The lens’ construction is of the highest standard, featuring metal cams for smooth zoom control and fast, precise framing.

The X-S1 is also ideally suited to capturing subjects close up. In standard mode, the zoom focuses down to 30cm, but by selecting Super Macro Mode, users can focus down to 1cm for frame-filling close-up images. Furthermore, the lens’ aperture is made up of nine blades for excellent bokeh effect photography.

Great results in every picture-taking scenario
The X-S1 features the same 2/3-inch 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor as the X10 which ensures high quality images regardless of the lighting conditions.

The unique EXR CMOS technology pioneered by Fujifilm allows the user to switch between three modes depending on the lighting conditions – or leave the camera to make its own choice in the Auto EXR mode.

Switching between the modes changes the performance of the sensor. The High Resolution option is perfect in bright conditions or when the very best picture quality is the primary aim. Wide Dynamic Range mode should be chosen in scenes of high contrast when the user wants to get details in both shadow and highlight areas of an image, while the High Sensitivity & Low Noise option should be selected for optimum results in low light conditions.

Coupled to the EXR CMOS sensor is the high speed EXR processor, which offers a minimal shutter lag of just 0.01sec and a high speed continuous shooting capability of seven frames-per-second at full resolution (Large JPEG) or 10 frames-per-second at six megapixel resolution (Medium JPEG).

The X-S1 also takes high-quality movies. It captures Full High Definition (1920 x 1080 pixels) video with stereo sound at 30 frames-per-second, which is saved in the H.264 format.

Easy composition and image review
The X-S1 offers a powerful combination of high quality electronic viewfinder and rear LCD to ensure composing and viewing images is quick and simple, regardless of the lighting conditions.

The 0.47-inch electronic viewfinder (EVF) features 1.44 million pixels for superb image clarity and has a wide viewing area of 26 degrees to reduce eye strain. The bright EVF makes it easy to check settings or adjust focus manually.

On the back of the X-S1 is a high quality, tiltable three-inch LCD. It features 460,000 pixels making it easier for users to scroll through menus, assess exposure accuracy and view images. The LCD also offers a useful Daylight mode that overcomes the problem of viewing the screen in bright conditions.

Full user control and picture taking versatility
The X-S1 offers a superb level of functionality whether users want to make picture taking as simple as using a compact or as involved as a fully-manual digital SLR.

For simplicity, the X-S1 will assess the subject and then select the relevant scene mode for the perfect result, automatically switching the EXR CMOS sensor accordingly. Not only does it ascertain the type of scene being photographed, it can also calculate whether an image contains a person, features backlighting or has any subject movement. ISO settings are taken care of too by the Auto ISO mode, which selects the optimum setting between ISO 100 and 3200. Those after more ISO flexibility can select up to ISO 12800 (Small JPEG format only).

Photographers after full control are well catered for with the X-S1. The camera offers a full range of conventional shooting functions (program/aperture-priority/shutter-priority/manual), plus users can also fine tune levels of colour, image sharpness and tone. Additionally, the X-S1 provides four auto bracketing options, eight Film Simulation and white balance functions and a Raw file format

Launched in February 2012, in the UK, the X-S1 will have an estimated selling price of £699.

Fujifilm X-S1 key features
• High quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom covering 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) with Intelligent Digital Zoom boosting range up to 1248mm
• Superb build quality and finish with rubberised coating and metal dials
• 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor
• Up to 10 frames-per-second shooting
• Large EVF with 1.44 million pixels and 26 degree viewing angle
• Tiltable three-inch rear LCD with Sunny Day mode
• Full HD video
• PASM modes
• Raw file format
• Film simulation modes
• Macro focusing down to 1cm
• Lithium battery providing up to 500 shots per charge
• Optical image stabilisation
• 360° Motion Panorama mode



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#1 Gam

The lens should've been faster. It's not good enough at 2.8.

7:28 am - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#2 Dante

Good to see Fuji getting serious and taking some of the X100 and X10 technology to a bridge. Fujifilm does not have to worry as much as other makers about brige cameras taking sales from DSLRs, which hopefully means it will deliver, finally, a serious bridge camera that no other camera makers want to make, a camera for those who do not want to fiddle and invest heavily in lenses but who are serious enough to get the best possible images without spending thousands of dollars.

7:58 am - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#3 Yoco

On the paper this is the 100 % best bridge camera until digital cameras been here.
It will be entry level DSLR Killer!!!

9:17 pm - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#4 Dan

The lens looks like a barrel. Strange

9:22 pm - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#5 Billy

I already own 2 Fuji super zoom cameras, the S200EXR and the HS20, and I'll tell you, these cameras take excellent photos! I might have missed it but I'm assuming that the new X-S1 will be manual focus like the others that I have. Also, the last question to find an answer to is if the lens will accept filters like my cameras do. WOW! Being able to zoom out to 1248mm is exhilarating and I can hardly wait until this camera is available in the USA.

9:28 pm - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#6 danaceb

BEHOLD, the return of the authentic 'Bridge Camera' after a many year hiatus (note true bridge cameras contain a 2/3" or larger sensor)

9:50 pm - Thursday, November 24, 2011

#7 cynic

@Gam
Why isn't it good enough? Yeah, it could have been faster along with heavier and much more expensive. Everything's a compromise.

@danaceb
Could you please offer a link stating "true" bridge use 2/3 inch sensors?. I was under the impression that most MODERN bridge cameras used 1/2.3 sensors.

12:41 am - Friday, November 25, 2011

#8 Mad Hungarian

Made in Japan perfection. Fujifilm's latest cameras brought back the excitement to photography. Excellent! Can wait to buy one.

3:28 pm - Friday, November 25, 2011

#9 Jonathan

Cynic, I believe you have stated two completely different sensor sizes.
Mathematically speaking;
1/2.3 inch = .435 inch
2/3 inch = 0.666 inch
Therefore 2/3 is a much larger sensor than the 1/2.3 used in most bridge cameras.Perhaps someone more experienced can confirm this as I'm only just starting to learn about cameras myself. Hope this helps.

6:02 pm - Friday, November 25, 2011

#10 Warren Lyons

I totally agree with Dante in his assesment of this camera. It will appeal both Bridge camera users willing to pay a premium price for much better IQ as well as would be entry DSLR buyers willing to give up a little IQ in return for the convenience of not changing lenses. Might even serve as a backup for pros, and even as a primary camera where a little IQ can be sacrificed. (law enforcement/surveilance, supermarket tabloids) in return for the same convenience

7:14 pm - Friday, November 25, 2011

#11 cynic

@Jonathan
I think you have missed my point. I was arguing against danaceb's statement that "true" bridge cameras use a 2/3 inch sensor. Nowhere did I state/infer that 1/2.3inch = 2/3inch.

11:15 pm - Friday, November 25, 2011

#12 Fred Shamootsin

I read on a few sites that the camera weighs nearly 1 Kilogram ( 920 grams at least ) which make the camera very heavy in hands for even short periods , let alone half a day use .I just hope Fuji have placed some Infrared sensors inside the camera and supplies a free wireless Remote Shutter release unit ( may be only costs Fuji a few bucks) but, in my opinion,as someone who has been following the NEWS about the camera and is interested in the camera,provided the IQ is good,makes a necessity for a camera that heavy, but a nice touch on Fuji's part and a positive selling point.I hope Fuji listens ( a wired remote is neither comfortable nor versatile compared to a wireless remote in the box). wait and see whether Fuji listens or not.

11:49 am - Saturday, November 26, 2011

#13 Mark T

Wow, this looks to be a winner; my only reservation is the external flash. If Fuji can start producing compatible dedicated flash guns I'll be a very happy bunny. I have the HS10 (brilliant camera) but the word 'vague' is an understatemnt when it comes to compatability.

11:59 am - Saturday, November 26, 2011

#14 gary watson

nothing about having image stabilisation built in which will make the zoom useless at long focal lenghts

3:19 pm - Sunday, November 27, 2011

#15 Joey Wilson

I've often daydreamed of a 'bridge' camera built closer to 'pro' spec, several steps above an HS20 or S40, metal body, flash shoe, bigger sensor. This seems to go along that line of thinking.

I can envision this sort of thing progressing to where someday, the top-line, full-tilt interchangeable lens/full size sensor camera will be as rare as view cameras became in the film days: Only reserved for very demanding, technical applications.

It's amazing how we've all become so jaded: I started out with a folding camera and a Kodak Photoguide, didn't even have a hand held meter, and used flash bulbs. The idea that a 10 or 20 power zoom in an automatic camera with all sorts of creative control that will never require a darkroom would have seemed like something from the 27th century just 25 years ago !

9:17 pm - Sunday, November 27, 2011

#16 salvador

When you compare photos taken with a bridge camera and a DSLR with a telephoto, there is a tremendous difference in quality. Hopefully, the larger sensor of the X-S1 will narrow that gap.

2:10 pm - Saturday, December 3, 2011

#17 Rick Clark

Got this off of Fuji's web site and it is "IS" on the camera good for that long zoom. I think you folks should watch the Fujiguy's on youtube they have the know on this one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq2tUftH-pY


FUJIFILM X-S1 key features:
High quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom covering 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) with Intelligent Digital Zoom boosting range up to 1248mm
Superb build quality and finish with rubberised coating and metal dials
12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor
Up to 10 frames-per-second shooting
Large EVF with 1.44 million pixels and 26 degree viewing angle
Tiltable three-inch rear LCD with Sunny Day mode
Full HD video
PASM modes
Raw file format
Film simulation modes
Macro focusing down to 1cm
Lithium battery providing up to 500 shots per charge
Optical image stabilisation
360° Motion Panorama mode

9:06 pm - Tuesday, December 6, 2011

#18 Sebastian Winterbottom

Dear Fellow Bloggers,

I am a complete novice on digital camera selection. My aim is to upload high quality images to my website that will consist of:

plant leaf samples, soil samples, exterior and interior property images including some landscape images.

I hope someone out there can help. Sebastian.

3:07 pm - Sunday, December 18, 2011

#19 Rick Clark

Read>Read>Read, that how you learn.

8:34 pm - Sunday, December 18, 2011

#20 Moz

35mm film worked with SLR @ compact So Why Not Digital Censers. nothing is impossible. Every 3 Months A New Camera is Produced,
9 times out of 10 it's just up graded
people are getting wise to this. you can still make 35mm Cameras one for beginners and one for keen amateur Plus Top End Professionals. Small censers still could be used
for budget cameras PS Every camera should have some sort of view finder And Lets Gets The Prices More Realistic. The Public Are Not Daft. The Fuji X-S1 I Would Pay That Price If It Had An APS sensor. For The Censer It Has Now. I Would Pay No More Than £350. At The Very Most. Thank You

5:00 pm - Tuesday, January 3, 2012

#21 Maurice

Far To Higher Price. Should Be No More Than £350

5:11 pm - Tuesday, January 3, 2012

#22 Maurice

If You Had A Vote 90 Out Of 100 Would Vote For A View Finder On All Compact Cameras, And That's The Truth.
Fuji X-S1 For That Price Should Have An APS Censer

5:25 pm - Tuesday, January 3, 2012

#23 Billy

More info for this camera: it will accept 62mm filters; the lens hood comes with the camera and is all-metal; there is an optional remote release available; weighs in at 945g or 33.3 oz, so it is built like a tank; it DOES have image stabilization; Fuji makes 2 different external flashes for this camera. All of this information came from the Fuji website. Let the fun begin!

6:05 pm - Tuesday, January 3, 2012

#24 tony

I can not believe the amount of negative comments by people who have'nt even taken the time to check the specifications and photos on Fuji's website.It looks to me that Fuji has done a lot of things we have been waiting for but wait,it's too heavy should have been smaller, maybe a compact with 26 x zoom. Get real and give the camera a chance!

5:40 am - Sunday, January 8, 2012

#25 Sebastian Winterbottom

Recently had email from one of the UK's most prestigious camera outlets who confirm there is no release date for the X-S1 for the UK market.

3:17 pm - Sunday, January 8, 2012

#26 Peggy

Will this really take great wildlife photos? With the 24-624mm equivalent Fujinon zoom lens I would hope so.

5:24 pm - Tuesday, January 17, 2012