Microsoft HD Photo Plug-In for Adobe Photoshop

December 8, 2007 | Mark Goldstein | Software | 4 Comments |

MicrosoftThe Microsoft HD Photo Plug-In allows you to open and save any HD Photo file (.wdp or possibly .hdp) in Adobe Photoshop. The HD Photo plug-in supports a wide range of pixel formats (including high dynamic range, wide gamut formats) and numerous advanced HD Photo features. HD Photo is also known as Windows Media Photo. This plug-in is designed for use with the CS2 or CS3 versions of Adobe Photoshop software running under Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft Windows Vista or Mac OS X.

Website: Download Microsoft HD Photo Plug-In for Adobe Photoshop (Windows)

Website: Download Microsoft HD Photo Plug-In for Adobe Photoshop (MAC)



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#1 Richard

if someone starts using this format from microsoft photography will become crap like its with the current jpg, open formats friends, foget using this thing

1:37 am - Monday, December 10, 2007

#2 John Nuttall

Underwhelmed - anything Microsoft is either going to be yet another standard and/or total rubbish. What the hell does MS know about photography? Come to that, what the hell do they know about decent & efficient Operating Systems?

12:42 am - Tuesday, December 11, 2007

#3 fxk

I'm not excited at all about Microsoft becomming involved with photo standards - they have a long track record that is, shall er say, less than open or even fairly competitive.

I would dearly love to see some type of open standard, or one in the public domain to replace JPEG - compression without loss and the like.

Given a choice between JPEG and a standard from Microsoft (or even Apple, for that matter), I'd just rather not switch - so goes my mistrust of them both.

5:24 pm - Tuesday, December 11, 2007

#4 Jordi

HD Photo forms the basis of a new extended version of JPEG. So it is an update. The compression technique at the heart of HD Photo has been adopted as the compression scheme for this new JPEG. The scheme was born a few years ago deep inside Microsoft's research labs. The other comments in this post seem to be generically anti-Microsoft just because they are Microsoft.

3:30 am - Sunday, January 6, 2008