Photographer’s Guide to the Fujifilm X10

April 11, 2012 | Zoltan Arva-Toth | Books | 8 Comments |
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White Knight Press has just released the Photographer’s Guide to the Fujifilm X10 e-book, with a paperback edition scheduled for a late April launch. This book, a complete guide to the operation and features of the Fujifilm X10 digital camera, is a follow-up to the author’s earlier guides to advanced compact digital cameras, including the Fujifilm X100 as well as models by Leica, Panasonic, Canon, and Nikon. The new book explains all operations, features, menus, and controls of the Fujifilm X10 camera in clear language, providing guidance not only about how to accomplish things with the camera, but when and why to use certain features. The guide’s more than 200 photographs, almost all in full colour, provide illustrations of the camera’s controls and menus, and include examples of the various types of photographs that can be taken using the many creative settings of the camera. The 338-page book is available now in PDF format for download for $9.95 through the website below.

Website: White Knight Press

Press Release

Photographer’s Guide to the Fujifilm X10: Getting the Most from Fujifilm’s Advanced Digital Camera

Publisher: White Knight Press, Henrico, Virginia, USA
Author: Alexander S. White
Publication Date: April 7, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-937986-03-2 (paperback) (to be published in late April 2012)
ISBM: 978-1-937986-00-1 (eBook)
Format: eBook or Perfect bound paperback, 5.5 x 8.5 inches (140 x 216 mm)
Interior: 338 pages, more than 200 mostly color photographs and illustrations, full   Index and Table of Contents; 3 Appendices
Retail price: $29.95 paperback (when released); $9.95 PDF download (available now)
Web site: http://www.whiteknightpress.com
E-mail: contact@whiteknightpress.com

This book, a complete guide to the operation and features of the Fujifilm X10 digital camera, is a follow-up to the author’s earlier guides to advanced compact digital cameras, including the Fujifilm X100 as well as models by Leica, Panasonic, Canon, and Nikon. The new book explains all operations, features, menus, and controls of the Fujifilm X10 camera in clear language, providing guidance not only about how to accomplish things with the camera, but when and why to use certain features. The book does not assume any specialized knowledge by the reader, but explains topics such as shooting modes, autofocus, manual focus, depth of field, aperture priority, shutter priority, HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography, white balance, ISO, and macro photography. The book shows how to take advantage of the camera’s unique CMOS sensor with Fujifilm’s EXR technology. This special sensor enables the camera to be configured for high resolution, high sensitivity in dim lighting, or high dynamic range, depending on the lighting conditions the photographer is faced with. The book also provides guidance about the many the X10’s many other advanced settings, including adjustments for Color, Sharpness, Highlight Tone, Shadow Tone, and numerous others.

The guide’s more than 200 photographs, almost all in full color, provide illustrations of the camera’s controls and menus, and include examples of the various types of photographs that can be taken using the many creative settings of the camera, including the Film Simulation settings, which let the photographer alter the color processing and other aspects of images; various menu options such as Dynamic Range and Intelligent Digital Zoom; and the camera’s strong set of features for continuous shooting.

In addition, the book goes beyond everyday photography with introductions to more advanced topics such as infrared photography, astrophotography, digiscoping, street photography, and creating 3D (three-dimensional) images that can be viewed with conventional red and blue 3D glasses.

The book also includes a full discussion of the video recording abilities of the Fujifilm X10, which can capture high-definition (HD) video with stereo sound and can take silent slow-motion movies to enable studies of sports and other actions.

In three appendices, the book provides information about accessories available for the camera, including cases, filter adapters, and external flash units; sets forth a list of useful web sites and other resources for further information; and includes a section with helpful “quick tips” that give particular insights into how to take advantage of the camera’s features in the most efficient ways possible.

The book includes a detailed Table of Contents and a full Index, so the reader can quickly find needed information about any particular feature or aspect of the camera. In the PDF version, the Table of Contents and Index are interactive, so the reader can click on a page reference to navigate to the desired topic instantly.

The book is available now in PDF format for download for $9.95 through http://www.whiteknightpress.com. ; The paperback version will be available for $29.95 through Amazon.com and other online sellers by late April or early May 2012.



Your Comments

8 Comments | Newest Oldest First | Post a Comment

#1 M.

Is there a chapter on how to avoid the white orbs?

3:12 pm - Wednesday, April 11, 2012

#2 Dainas

naturally, but all jokes aside the camera can produce some amazing results. Sad thing is you need a guide to let the camera show you what it can do. Most reviewers and users are lazy and fuji idiotically made the X10s default settings output Point and Click IQ. With a few stupid things turn off or properly set the camera can do much better even with auto iso on.

i just keep the noise reduction set to low, jpeg and DR and ISO around 100-800. Orbs are controlled in situations they would arise and overall IQ is distinctly closer to Nikon V1 than Canon S100.

6:03 pm - Wednesday, April 11, 2012

#3 Dainas

ugh also forgot, colors set to taste, but highlights and shadows must always be set to soft or medium soft as their default setting also destroys IQ(clipping); but i digress. No surprise someone wrote a guide for this camera. So many dumb defaults that destroy IQ for no benefit to the user. If it didn't turn out to take such great pictures with its versatile lens i would have returned my X10 or tossed it without second thought.

6:15 pm - Wednesday, April 11, 2012

#4 Joey Wilson

I'LL be happy if it has an explanation of E X R that I can understand once and for all. I've worn out the Internet and even Fuji's own E X R website(s), but still haven't managed to wrap my head around how/what it's doing, though I must admit it does it very well.

I have been beyond satisfied with this camera: The same zoom on an SLR would be astronomically priced, and the f2/2.8 range lets me use it the way I used to use lenses back in 'prehistoric times'. A metal bodied camera with knobs, what a hoot !

7:21 am - Thursday, April 12, 2012

#5 Alex Monro

Joey, I'll try a simple explaination of EXR.

You have a 12MP sensor, with slightly unusual layout and readout circuits. You can use this to create 3 alternative forms of images.

1) A straight 12MP image.

2) By binning (averaging out adjacent pixels) you can have a reduced noise 6MP image.

3) By giving adjacent pixels slightly different exposure times, you can create 2 simultaneous different exposures, and then combine them by HDR techniques to give you an extended dynamic range 6MP image.

A bit simplified, but that's basically what Fuji's EXR technology does.

1:15 pm - Thursday, April 12, 2012

#6 Brian Taylor

I have taken well over 2000 images since getting my X-10 in December 2011. A fabulous little camera that produces excellent images in almost every situation. I have NEVER seen an offending orb. Yes there have been some blown highlights but no worse than my Nikon D70s, D300 or Canon G10.

The silent shutter is a great bonus for stage shows and the fast f2~2.8 lens delivers crisp images even when hand held.

A highly recommended camera but sad to say it has a sh*tty user manual, about as poor as the Nikon Creative Lighting System description.

HTH
Brian

11:15 am - Wednesday, April 25, 2012

#7 Peter Ralph

An excellent book by a competent author explaining the abilities and operations of the most usable camera I have owned.Have had cameras for about fifteen years.Have been a constant traveler for 2 years I tend to live for a while in places I visit).I had a SLR with two lenses. A pain. Next trip got an 18/200mm lens. Still a pain. Only average image quality and missed heaps of shots through not having the camera with me all the time. Tried a Samsung WB150..portable and good but some images were not up to scratch shots due to camera limitations and my lack of skill. Got a Fuji X10 2 months ago.....am completely happy.The camera is very unobtrusive, and is just pocketable, which means I take it with me every time I go out.It is easy to use and virtually all images are top quality. Orbs are a non issue. Only suggestions I would make if using the camera while traveling is to set the FN button to enable Intelligent Digital Zoom and buy a spare battery. Now and then the extra zoom is needed and image quality is still excellent.

12:45 pm - Saturday, August 18, 2012

#8 Eric

I bought the Fuji X-10 earlier in the year as I was a former Leica film guy who only used two lenses. A 35mm and a 90mm, which fill all my fine art needs. The Fuji X 10 lens covers almost every situation and it is fast and sharp. But the downside of this camera is the manual. I have been an industrial photographer for almost 45 years, but I have no idea how to get the most out of this camera. I shoot with a Nikon D-700 for my professional work, but haven't been able to get the image quality from the X-10 that I know it is capable of delivering, even in RAW. I am planning on buying this book in hope that it will help get the results I am seeking. The X-10 is a wonderful camera (I wish it was larger) and a joy to use. There are three accessories that are a must-have; their overpriced lens hood (which slightly blocks the viewfinder), a special order, non-standard size Marumi 40mm polarizing filter and and extra batteries. Would like to see this camera with built in HDR.

3:05 pm - Friday, October 26, 2012