Canon EOS 77D Review

May 16, 2017 | Mark Goldstein | |

Introduction

The Canon EOS 77D is a new prosumer APS-C DSLR camera. The EOS 77D features a 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor, Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system which offers continuous autofocus during live view stills shooting, pentamirror viewfinder with 95% coverage and 0.82x magnification, 3-inch vari-angle LCD touchscreen with 1040k-dots, 1080p Full HD video up to 60fps in MP4 format, 6fps burst shooting, 45 all cross-type point AF system, DIGIC 7 image processor, 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering system, built-in wi-fi, bluetooth and NFC connectivity, 5-axis digital image stabilizer for movies, and an ISO range of 100-51200. The Canon EOS 77D sits below the older EOS 80D and above the equally new EOS 800D (Rebel T7i) and is available priced at £829.99 / $849 for the body only or £919 / $999 with the new EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens.

Ease of Use

From the outside the new Canon EOS 77D looks very similar to its big brother, the EOS 80D, which we reviewed a year ago. Measuring 131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2 mm, it's similar in size to the 80D, but substantially lighter at 540g including the battery and memory card. There's a textured area on both the deep hand-grip on the front and around the thumb-rest on the rear of the 77D, and this camera is well-suited to everyone with normal to large-sized hands. The 77D uses an aluminum alloy and polycarbonate resin with glass fiber chassis, which accounts for the difference in weight compared to the EOS 80D, but note that, unlike the 80D, it isn't weather-sealed.

On more basic SLRs, adjustments are usually made using a combination of buttons and a single control wheel. This is fine for novices, but awkward for more experienced photographers who want to be able to quickly adjust a combination of exposure, shutter speed or aperture. Like Canon's other semi-pro cameras, the Canon EOS 77D offers two control wheels; one on the top of the handgrip, and a large, spinning dial on the back of the camera. This rear quick control dial is characteristic of all high-end Canon EOS cameras. It's a bit of an acquired taste compared to more conventional control dials, but you quickly get used to it and it is easy enough to spin.

The 77D also has a conventional four-way controller set within the rear quick control dial, rather than the joystick that higher-end Canon DSLRs use, making it better suited to upgraders from the more consumer-orientated 760D / Rebel T6s. The quick control dial features a lock switch positioned directly underneath which helps to prevent unintentional changes to your settings.

The 77D has a handy dedicated Q button on the rear which which opens the Quick Control screen. Depending on which shooting mode you're using, this lets you set various parameters via the LCD screen, using either the four-way controller or the touch-screen to move around the various options. The Quick Control screen is particularly well-suited to beginners and tripod work.

The Canon EOS 77D features built-in wi-fi connectivity, which allows you to share images during playback via the Wi-Fi menu option. Enable the Wi-Fi menu option and the Wi-Fi Function option appears underneath, which contains six icons. The 77D can connect to another camera, a smartphone, a computer, a printer, the internet and a DNLA device respectively. Setup is long-winded but relatively straight-forward for each scenario, although you'll need a basic understanding of the protocols involved (or consult the supplied User Guide). Note that you need to install the dedicated and free EOS Remote app to connect the 77D to the world's most popular smartphone, or the Apple iPad and iPod Touch, or an Android device. You can then use your smartphone or tablet to remotely control almost every aspect of the camera's operation, review images on a larger, more detailed screen and to transfer images between devices.

The 77D can tag your images with GPS data (latitude, longitude, altitude and shooting time) using the new always-on Bluetooth connection. We prefer having GPS built into the camera rather than having to sync it with an additional device, although it does consequently suffer from the issue of slightly affecting the battery life. The EOS 77D has also added built-in NFC, which allows you to quickly transfer images to a compatible smart device by simply tapping them together.

On top of the Canon EOS 77D, positioned above the status LCD display, are three buttons, each of which has a single function rather than the dual-function buttons of some Canon DSLRs. While this makes it simpler to understand and easier to operate with the camera held up to your eye, it does inevitably lead to more scrolling through the menu system. There are two LCD displays on the EOS 77D, the 3-inch colour LCD on the rear and the smaller status panel on the top. On cheaper cameras, the LCD on the rear usually has to do both jobs, but on this model most of the key settings are visible from above on the smaller panel. This can make the Canon EOS 77D quicker to use and it may also extend the battery life, depending on how extensively you use the LCD screen.

Canon EOS 77D
Front of the Canon EOS 77D

The main LCD screen offers a fantastic resolution of 1,040K dots, so you may find yourself using it more often than you thought. It allows you to judge the critical sharpness of your photos using the LCD screen, which has been a long-standing issue on Canon's entry- and mid-range DSLRs. The screen also has an aspect ratio of 3:2 - i.e. identical to that of the sensor - so that the photos fill the screen completely, with no black stripes along the top and bottom.

The EOS 77D has an articulated screen, which helps to realise the full potential of Live View and video shooting. The high-res, free-angle LCD screen is much more than just a novelty - it's a lot more versatile than the usual combination of optical viewfinder and fixed LCD, providing new angles of view and enhancing your overall creativity. Above all, it's a fun way of composing your images. The EOS 77D’s viewfinder also has a built-in eye sensor, something that the older 80D doesn't have.

The 77D is the latest EOS camera to feature a touch-screen. It supports a variety of multi-touch gestures, such as pinching and swiping, for choosing shooting modes, changing settings, tracking faces, selecting auto-focus points, and focusing and taking a picture in Live View mode. In playback you can swipe to move from image to image and pinch to zoom in and out, just like on an iPad or other tablet device. The ability to focus and take the shot with a single press of your finger on the screen makes it quick and easy to capture the moment.

The EOS 77D's built-in pop-up flash features a built-in Integrated Speedlite Transmitter for controlling up to two groups of off-camera Speedlites without the need for an external transmitter. Note that the 77D still doesn't have a PC Sync port for connecting the camera to external lights, limiting its use in studio environments. There's also the expected hotshoe for use with one of Canon's external flashguns.

Like most DSLRs aimed at beginners and amateurs, the EOS 77D provides a number of auto shooting modes aimed at beginners, including portrait, landscape, close-up, sports, night portrait, hand-held night scene, and HDR backlight control, grouped under the SCN option on the Mode dial on the top-left of the camera, which comes complete with a central lock button to prevent accidental movement. HDR Backlight takes three shots at different exposures and combines them into one with greater shadow and highlight detail, and the Hand-held Night scene mode takes multiple images at fast shutter speeds and blends them together for a sharp result. The fully-automatic Scene Intelligent Auto mode analyses the scene in front of you and automatically picking the best settings, much like the systems used by lot of digital compacts.

There are, of course, manual and semi-automatic modes for users who want more advanced exposure control. Canon refers to these advanced operations as the 'creative zone' and provides all the normal settings including Program, Aperture and Shutter Priority and the full manual mode. Additionally, the Creative Auto mode is targeted at beginners who have grown out of using the Full Auto mode, allowing you to change a few key settings using the LCD screen via a simple slider system for changing the aperture and exposure compensation, or Background and Exposure as the camera refers to them.

Canon EOS 77D
Front of the Canon EOS 77D

Reflecting its more consumer-friendly nature, the 77D offers ten creative filters, which are only available when shooting in Live View mode and for JPEGs, not RAW files. These include Soft Focus, which dramatizes an image and smooths over any shiny reflections, Grainy Black and White creates that timeless look, Toy Camera adds vignetting and color shift, and Miniature Effect makes a scene appear like a small-scale model, simulating the look from a tilt-shift lens.

In addition a feature called Basic+ applies a creative ambiance to images when shooting in the Basic modes. Essentially a more extreme version of the well-established Picture Styles, Basic+ enhancements that can be applied to the scene modes include Vivid, Soft, Warm, Intense, Cool and Brighter. There's also some control over what is essentially the white balance via the Shoot by Lighting effect, with the options being Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Tungsten, Flourescent and Sunset.

Once the EOS 77D is in the 'creative zone', users can adjust the ISO setting to one of nine positions from 100 to H(51200), which is more than adequate for most lighting conditions. The EOS 77D offers a range of three Auto focus modes (One Shot, AI Focus and AI Servo), and there are six preset, auto, kelvin and custom white balance options. The pentamirror viewfinder, which offer 95% coverage and 0.82x magnification, displays key exposure information including ISO speed AF mode selection and metering.

The 77D uses a completely new 45-point auto-focus system, and all 45 of them are cross-type points, with the centre point being the extra sensitive double-cross type at f/2.8 and featuring EV-3 low-light sensitivity, helping to ensure that moving objects remain in focus even in very low light. There are four metering modes including a 4% Spot metering mode, useful in tricky lighting conditions as an alternative to the excellent and consistent Evaluative metering system. The 77D is the latest EOS camera to include infra-red and flickering light sensitivity, with the flicker detection mode automatically compensates for tricky indoor lighting by only taking the shot when the light levels are at their brightest level.

The Canon EOS 77D has a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000th sec, compared to the EOS 80D's faster 1/8000th sec, and it also has a slower flash-sync speed of 1/200th sec compared to the EOS 80D's 1/250th sec setting.

The menu system uses a simplified tab structure that does away completely with scrolling, with 15 colour-coded horizontal tabs (dependant upon the shooting mode) and up to 7 options in each one, providing quick and easy access to the various options. You can even setup your own customised menu page for instant access to frequently used settings via the My Menu tab. Only the complex Custom Functions menu detracts a little from the overall usability.

Canon EOS 77D
Rear of the Canon EOS 77D

We tested the EOS 77D with the new EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens lens, which offers a fairly versatile focal range and crucially includes image stabilisation. This is important for Canon, as competitors like Sony, Olympus and Pentax all offer image stabilisation in their DSLRs. The difference between Canon (and Nikon) and the others is that Sony, Olympus and Pentax have opted for stabilisation via the camera body, rather than the lens, which therefore works with their entire range of lenses. Canon's system is obviously limited by which lenses you choose, but it does offer the slight advantage of showing the stabilising effect through the viewfinder. Canon and Nikon also claim that a lens-based anti-shake system is inherently better too, but the jury's out on that one.

The Canon EOS 77D offers fast, positive autofocus with the new kit lens, and can track moving subjects very well. The new EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens is also a very quiet performer, thanks to the built-in USM (ultra-sonic motor), which makes this lens well-suited to video recording and more candid photography. If you're upgrading from an older or cheaper digital EOS model and already have a lens or lenses, you can also buy the 77D body-only.

The EOS 77D features the latest DIGIC 7 processor, which produces noticeably faster image processing, start-up and image review times, and better noise reduction in high-ISO images than older EOS cameras. The 77D can shoot in the fastest Continuous mode at a speed of 6fps for an unlimited number of full-sized JPEGs or 27 RAW images.

The 77D has a very similar Live View system to the 80D. If you're new to DSLRs and don't understand the terminology, basically Live View allows you to view the scene in front of you live on the LCD screen, rather than through the traditional optical viewfinder. This is an obvious attraction for compact camera users, who are familiar with holding the camera at arm's length and composing via the LCD screen. It's also appealing to macro shooters, for example, as it's often easier to view the screen than look through the viewfinder when the camera is mounted on a tripod at an awkward angle.

There's a dedicated Live View button on the rear of the camera to the right of the viewfinder, with the Off/On/Movie switch on the left allowing you to choose between Movie or Stills shooting. A horizontal Electronic Level and very useful live histogram can be enabled to help with composition and exposure, and you can zoom in by up to 10x magnification of the image displayed on the LCD screen. Focusing is achieved either via the AF-On Lock button or more conventionally by half-pressing the shutter-button. Live View can also be controlled remotely using the supplied EOS utility software, which allows you to adjust settings and capture the image from a PC.

Live View attempts to satisfy both the consumer and more technical user, with four types of focusing system on offer. Quick AF works by physically flipping the camera mirror to engage the auto-focus sensor, which then momentarily blanks the LCD screen and causes a physical sound, before the image is displayed after about 1/2 second.

Canon EOS 77D
Top of the Canon EOS 77D

The other methods, Flexizone Single, Flexizone Multi and AF + Tracking with Face Detection, use an image contrast auto-focus system, much like that used by point-and shoot compacts, the main benefits being the complete lack of noise during operation, and no LCD blackout, and additionally a phase-detection system that's cleverly employed directly on the camera's image sensor plane. All of the effective pixels on the EOS 77D's CMOS sensor are able to perform both still imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously (dubbed "Dual Pixel CMOS AF"), which makes the three Live View modes almost as quick as the Quick AF mode, especially the Flexizone Single mode, taking a less than a second to focus on a clearly-defined subject in bright light. You can also move the AF point anywhere around the middle 80% of the frame, and the 77D successfully and quickly detected faces in most situations.

The EOS 77D is the latest Canon DSLR to offer AI Servo autofocussing in live view. Providing you half press the 77D's shutter release, it'll maintain focus before and during a shot with no focusing hesitation at the point of shooting, which is great if you spend a lot of time photographing moving subjects through live view.

Live View and Dual Pixel CMOS AF are also used for the Canon EOS 77D's movie mode. If you turn the On/Off switch to the third position denoted by the movie camera icon and then press the dedicated Movie button to the right of the viewfinder, the camera will enter the Movie Live View mode. Before you start filming, you need to focus on the subject either manually or using auto focus as described above. Note that you cannot set the aperture, shutter speed (within limits) or ISO manually, only AE lock and exposure compensation if you feel a need for it. Once everything is set up, you can start filming by hitting the dedicated Movie button again.

The EOS 77D offers a choice of 60/50/30/35/24fps when recording Full 1920x1080 HD video clips in either the ALL-I or IPB codecs with optional embedded time code, and 60/50/20/25fps when shooting at 720p, complete with a new five-axis Digital IS system if you choose to turn it on, which helps to stabilise video footage when a non-stabilised lens is used. Note however that the available frame rates are also dependent on what you have set in the menu under "Video system": NTSC or PAL.

The EOS 77D will automatically adjust focus during filming, and you can initiate auto-focus at any time while recording a clip. However, be warned that this can do more harm than good, as, depending on the lens, the microphone can pick up the sound of the focus motor, and the subject might even go out of focus for a second or two.

Basic in-camera movie editing allows you to shorten a video file by clipping segments from the beginning or the end. There is a built-in microphone for stereo recording, and you can connect an external microphone equipped with a stereo mini plug to the camera's external microphone IN terminal. Note that there is no headphone jack for audio monitoring, as on the EOS 80D. You can manually adjust the sound recording level in 64 steps to help ensure that the audio track matches the visual quality of the video, and there's also an electronic Wind Filter.

Canon EOS 77D
The Canon EOS 77D In-hand

The EOS 77D uses the same dust-removal technology as previous models, where the sensor is shaken briefly at high frequency to dislodge any dust particles from its surface. This could delay the need for manual sensor cleaning, perhaps indefinitely, but it won't be able to remove 'sticky' deposits like salt spray, pollen or the smears left behind by careless sensor cleaning or the wrong kind of solvent. The 77D also inherits the internal Dust Delete Data system from the 80D, which can map the position of visible dust on the sensor. This can then be deleted automatically after the shoot with the supplied Digital Photo Professional software.

Lens Aberration Correction is a feature that's actually a lot simpler that it initially sounds. Basically it corrects the unwanted effects of vignetting, typically seen in wide-angle photos in the corners of the frame, and chromatic aberrations, otherwise known as purple fringing. The 77D contains a database of correction data for many Canon lenses and, if Lens Aberration Correction is enabled, automatically applies it to JPEG images. For RAW images the correction is applied later in the Digital Photo Professional software. Up to 40 lenses can be programmed into the 77D, with over 80 currently available to choose from. Lens Aberration Correction is a useful and effective addition, particularly for JPEG shooters, and can safely be left turned on all of the time.

Once you have captured a photo, the Canon EOS 77D has an average range of options for playing, reviewing and managing your images. More information about a captured image can be seen on the LCD by pressing the Info button, which brings up an image histogram and all the shooting Exif data, including shutter speed and the time and date it was captured, with a second press displaying an additional RGB histogram. It is simple to get a closer look at an image as users can zoom in up to 15 times, and it is also possible to view pictures in a set of nine contact sheet. You can also delete an image, rotate an image, view a slideshow, protect images so that they cannot be deleted, and set various printing options. A rating of 1 to 5 can be assigned to your images in-camera, and these tags can also be viewed on a computer using Canon’s DPP software and some third-party image editing programs.

For RAW shooters, the EOS 77D features in-camera RAW image processing. The following adjustments can be applied to any RAW image that you have taken - Brightness, Quality, White Balance, Color Space, Picture Style, Peripheral Illumination Correction, Auto Lighting Optimizer, Distortion Correction, High-ISO Noise Reduction, and Chromatic Aberration Correction. The image is then saved as an additional new JPEG file without affecting the original RAW data.

The documentation that comes with the 77D is very good, as it is with all Canon cameras, with a detailed manual that includes everything you need to know about the camera's operation. Unfortunately Canon have decided to cut their costs by only including it on the supplied CD-ROM, which isn't much use when you're out shooting with the camera. Battery life on the EOS 77D is good for around 600 shots thanks to the new 1040mAh battery, which is somewhat reduced compared to the EOS 80D's 960 shots.