Canon EOS M5 Review

December 23, 2016 | Amy Davies | |

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 24 megapixel Fine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 8Mb.

As we’d expect for a camera fitted with the same sensor and processor combination as the Canon EOS 80D, files from the EOS M5 are very pleasing. Indeed, if you’re already a Canon user, you will probably be happy to add the EOS M5 to your existing arsenal. Colours are warm and vibrant, having a decent amount of punch without being over the top - in short, they have that classic Canon saturation which we’ve come to expect from other Canon sensors.

JPEG images have a good amount of detail, but you can get even more from the camera if you use the “Fine Detail” Picture Style setting from the quick or main menu. You can start to see a little noise and image smoothing creep in to the shadow areas at ISO 800, but images taken at ISO 1600 or ISO 3200 are still more than usable at normal printing and web sizes. The high ISO settings perform well, but you may want to avoid using ISO 6400 if you have any intention of keeping very fine detail present - while the ISO 12800 and ISO 25600 are best reserved for emergencies where getting the shot is more important than image quality.

Automatic white balance does a good job of coping with a variety of different lighting conditions, perhaps ever so slightly over compensating under artificial lights to produce a cooler than realistic image. The overall effect is generally pleasing though, and you can always switch to a specific white balance setting if you’re looking for greater accuracy.

Exposures are generally pleasingly accurate, with Canon’s all-purpose metering system doing a good job. As with other Canon cameras, metering will be weighted towards the AF point of the image - this can sometimes result in under or over exposure if you’re shooting a very high contrast scene. It’s relatively rare for it to happen, but it’s something to keep an eye on in certain situations.

Noise

ISO sensitivity can be set between ISO 100 and ISO 25600 in full-stop increments. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting, with JPEG on the left and the RAW equivalent on the right.

JPEG

RAW

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

iso100.jpg iso100raw.jpg
   

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

iso200.jpg iso200raw.jpg
   

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

iso400.jpg iso400raw.jpg
   

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

iso800.jpg iso800raw.jpg
   

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600raw.jpg
   

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

iso3200.jpg iso3200raw.jpg
   

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

iso6400.jpg iso6400raw.jpg
   

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

iso12800.jpg iso12800raw.jpg
   

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

iso25600.jpg iso25600raw.jpg

Flash

The flash settings on the EOS M are Auto, Manual Flash On/Off, and Red-Eye Reduction. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1m.

Flash Off - Wide Angle

Flash On - Wide Angle

ISO 64 ISO 64
   

Flash Off - Telephoto

Flash On - Telephoto

ISO 64 ISO 64

And here are a couple of portrait shots. As you can see, neither the Flash On setting nor the Red-Eye Reduction option caused any amount of red-eye.

Flash On

flash_on.jpg

Creative Filters

The Creative Filters shooting mode contains 8 different options to help spice up your images.

HDR

Fish-eye

filterHDR.jpg filterfisheye.jpg
   

Art Bold

Water Painting

filterartbold.jpg filterwaterpaintingeffect.jpg
   

Miniature

Toy Camera

filterminuatureeffect.jpg filtertoycamera.jpg
   

Soft Focus

Grainy B/W

filtersoftfocus.jpg filtergrainybw.jpg