Canon PowerShot G7 X Review

October 21, 2014 | Mark Goldstein | |

Introduction

The Canon PowerShot G7 X is a new pocketable premium compact camera with a large CMOS image sensor and a fast lens. The metal-bodied G7 X has a 1.0-type back-illuminated 20.2 Megapixel CMOS sensor, an f/1.8-2.8, 4.2x lens with 9-blade aperture, full manual controls, shooting mode and exposure compensation dials, 3-inch tilting LCD touchscreen with 1,040K dots, built-in pop-up flash, DIGIC 6 processor, wi-fi and NFC connectivity, ISO range of 100-12800, full HD movie recording, 14-bit RAW image capture, 31 AF points, focus peaking function, 6.5 fps burst shooting and a lens control ring. The Canon Powershot G7 X is available in black priced at £579 / €599 / $699.99.

Ease of Use

Measuring 103.0 x 60.4 x 40.4 mm and weighing 304g including the battery and memory card, the Canon PowerShot G7 X is significantly smaller and lighter than the G1 X Mk II camera that sits above it in Canon's PowerShot range. Featuring a metal body with a solid feel and sturdy construction, the G7 X feels very well made indeed, with external controls that offer just the right amount of stiffness and resistance and are large enough to be easily and quickly accessed in the heat of the action. The Canon PowerShot G7 X will fit into a trouser or shirt pocket, but is more at home in a deep coat pocket or a small camera bag.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X features a large multi-aspect, 20.2 megapixel CMOS sensor that captures images either in the 3:2, 4:3, 16:9 or 1:1 aspect ratios whilst maintaining the same angle of view, even when shooting RAW images. The 1-inch sensor should add up to better image quality especially in low-light, greater depth-of-field, and greater dynamic range, all the things that your typical compact cameras struggles to deliver.

The G7 X has a very handy exposure compensation dial on top, a useful control that was omitted from the G1 X Mk II, although setting the ISO speed is still a rather convoluted affair. The G7 X doesn't have an optical viewfinder, and there's no way to add an electronic one either. Another grumble is that, annoyingly for such a creatively rich camera, the full user guide is still provided on CD only. In what comes across as a cursory gesture, only a very slim printed quick start guide is included in the box. Canon have also decided to only provide their software via download from their website.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

The Canon PowerShot G7 X's unassuming-looking front plate is dominated by the 4.2x zoom lens, with a bulb for the built-in self-timer/AF assist lamp flanking it on the left. Note that there's no thread included for fitting filters. The G7 X doesn't have a front control dial, as featured on EOS DSLR cameras, which makes changing the aperture and full Manual shooting mode a little more difficult.

Instead you use a combination of the lens control ring and the rear navigation wheel to change the aperture and shutter speed, each of which can be configured to suit your particular way of working. The clicking lens ring can be assigned to one of nine different settings, accessed via the Ring Function button on the rear (which itself can be customised). We found the rear navigation wheel on the rear a bit too thin to use precisely and quickly.

There's no handgrip on the Canon PowerShot G7 X, just a textured surface, which makes it more difficult easier to steady the camera, although there is a textured small pad at the back for your right thumb to rest on.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

From left to right the G7 X's top-plate houses the folding pop-up flash, with a switch on the side for manually releasing it, a springy raised nipple-style shutter release button surrounded by a rocker switch for operating the optically stabilised 4.2x zoom (24-100mm equivalent on a 35mm camera), and behind this again the small, recessed on/off button. The fact that the lens is image stabilised, says Canon, provides a four-stop advantage when shooting handheld, while the Intelligent IS system analyses the focal length, focal distance and type of camera movement and applies the most appropriate mode from seven possible settings, and the Hybrid IS system makes shooting macros easier than before by counteracting both shift and angular movements.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X is quick to power up in a second or so, the rear LCD blinking into life with the optical zoom lens simultaneously extending from storage within the body to its maximum wide-angle setting. It starts at the equivalent of 24mm, making it very useful for those landscapes group portraits or getting the required shot in confined spaces. The G7 X's lens has bright apertures of f/1.8 at the wide-angle end of the zoom range and f/2.8 at full telephoto, plus a 9-blade aperture for better bokeh effects. As a further aid to landscape fans, a 3-stop neutral density filter option is provided among the function menu options, to be turned on or off as required, and the horizontal Electronic Level and RGB histogram can be enabled to help with composition and exposure.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Tilting LCD Screen

The G7 X has a very good continuous shooting mode, which in conjunction with Tracking AF makes it well-suited to both slow and fast moving subjects. The Canon PowerShot G7 X can capture up to 692 full-resolution JPEG shots at 6.5fps with the focus point locked at the first frame, or you can shoot continuously at 4.4fps with AF tracking.

The shooting mode dial features settings for Auto capture, Hybrid Auto, Program, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority and Manual, along with a user customisable setting, a smattering of scene modes (8 in all), Creative Effects and Creative Shot modes, and finally a video mode. The Canon PowerShot can shoot 1080p HD video quality at 1920x1080 pixels at 60fps or 30fps, you can adjust the aperture, shutter speed and ISO, and there's manual focus peaking too. The G7 X also boasts stereo sound courtesy of tiny microphones positioned on top, and you can use the creative filters and the 5x optical zoom when filming.

The Creative Filters shooting mode contains 10 different options to help spice up your images. The High Dynamic Range mode is probably the most useful, automatically taking three exposures of the same scene at different settings, then combining them in-camera to create a single image with greater dynamic range. Note that you need to mount the G7 X on a tripod or stable surface to avoid camera-shake.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
The Canon PowerShot G7 X in-hand

We appreciated the flexibility presented by the tilting LCD screen in terms of trying out unusual and formerly awkward framing. It can be tilted up through 180° for easier selfies, but it can't be tilted down. The LCD is a 3 inch monitor with 3:2 aspect ratio and a a high resolution of 1040K dots.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X has a touch focus/shoot option which is on by default. To switch it off, change the Touch Shutter option in the main menu. This then becomes a touch focus screen which will lock onto the subject wherever you touched, with a press of the Display button centering the AF point. In playback the touchscreen can be used to change the magnification of an image by spreading and pinching two fingers, and switch between images by swiping from side to side, just like on a smartphone. You can also adjust the LCD's touch sensitivity to your liking with Standard and High settings available.

On the right flank of the G7 X is a button for quickly connecting to a previously paired smartphone or tablet. The G7 X's wi-fi capabilities allow you to share images during playback via the Up button on the navigation pad. Simply enter a nickname for the camera and five more icons then appear, connecting the G7 X to another camera, a smartphone, a computer, a printer and the Internet respectively. Setup is relatively straight-forward for each scenario, although you'll need a basic understanding of the protocols involved. Note that you need to install the dedicated and free Canon CameraWindow app to connect the G7 X to an iOS or Android device.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Top of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

The G7 X's wi-fi functionality is also employed to tag your images with GPS data recorded by your smartphone ( latitude, longitude, altitude and shooting time) via the Canon CameraWindow app, which effectively replaces a more conventional built-in GPS system. We actually prefer having GPS built-in to the camera rather than having to sync it with an additional device, so in this regard the G7 X doesn't compare well with rivals that offer this feature, although it does side-step the issue of negatively affecting battery life. The G7 X also features NFC (Near Field Communication) technology (the same technology that's used for mobile payments), which allows you to connect it to a compatible Internet enabled device or another NFC-enabled camera by simply tapping them together.

Returning to the rear, alongside the Ring Function button (which also doubles up as the Delete button) is the one-touch movie record button, which as its name suggests instantly begins recording a movie at the current quality and creative settings.

Underneath this pair of controls is the four-way selection or control pad, with, at points north, east, south and west a means of selecting the burst shooting mode, choosing from the on-board flash settings, setting the Display mode, and activating manual, normal or 5cm macro focus modes. The G7 X's 31-point AF system focuses very quickly for a compact camera in either good light or bad and at both ends of the zoom range, with a slight delay of around 0.15 second.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

At its centre is the Function/Set button that is again consistent with the Canon G-series. Press this button at its centre when in any of the capture modes and an L-shaped toolbar that will be familiar to Canon users appears on the screen, offering pull out toolbars with further options from the range when you come to rest on a particular setting.

At the bottom right hand corner of the backplate are a further pairing of buttons for playing back your images and accessing the main menu. A press of the Menu button brings up a trio of folders on screen, the first the Shooting menu where the likes of the AF assist beam and blink detection modes can be turned on or off, the second the Setup menu where sound options and LCD brightness can be tweaked, and the third being a 'My Menu' option for commonly used functions.

On the right hand flank of the camera - viewed from the back - we find covered ports for HDMI out and a combined USB 2.0/AV out connection. On the bottom is a familiar metal screw thread for a tripod, and a sliding cover for the compartment that houses the lithium-ion battery needed for power and the SD, SDHC or SDXC cards needed for image storage. Battery life is not great at around 210 shots from a full charge, so you'll need to budget for at least one spare battery.

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 20 megapixel SuperFine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 8Mb.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X produces images of very good quality. It recorded noise-free images at ISO 125-800, with some noise at ISO 1600. ISO 3200 and 6400 show more obvious noise but still remain perfectly usable, although the fastest setting of ISO 12800 is best avoided.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X handled chromatic aberrations well, with limited purple fringing effects appearing only in high contrast situations and generally at the edges of the frame. The built-in flash worked well indoors, with no red-eye and good overall exposure, although there's noticeable vignetting at 24mm. The night photograph was excellent, with the maximum shutter speed of 30 and the Bulb mode seconds being long enough for after-dark shots.

Anti-shake works very well when hand-holding the camera in low-light conditions or when using the telephoto end of the zoom range. Macro performance is good, allowing you to focus as close as 5cm away from the subject. The images were a little soft straight out of the Canon PowerShot G7 X at the default sharpening setting and ideally require some further sharpening in an application like Adobe Photoshop, or you can change the in-camera setting.

The extensive range of My Color modes and Creative Filters make it easy to spice up your images, while the Dynamic Range and Shadow Correction modes help to etract more detail from the shadow and highlight areas.

Noise

There are 8 ISO settings available on the Canon PowerShot G7 X. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting for both JPEG and RAW formats.

JPEG RAW

ISO 125 (100% Crop)

ISO 125 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

Focal Range

The Canon PowerShot G7 X's 4.2x zoom lens offers a fairly versatile focal range, as illustrated by these examples:

24mm

100mm

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web - Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images are a little soft at the default sharpening setting. You can change the in-camera sharpening level if you don't like the default look.

Original (100% Crop)

Sharpened (100% Crop)

   

File Quality

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has 2 different JPEG image quality settings available, with Fine being the highest quality option. Here are some 100% crops which show the quality of the various options, with the file size shown in brackets.

SuperFine (6.70Mb) (100% Crop)

Fine (4.43Mb) (100% Crop)

   

RAW (18.4Mb) (100% Crop)

 
 

Chromatic Aberrations

The Canon PowerShot G7 X handled chromatic aberrations well during the review, with fairly limited purple fringing present around the edges of objects in high-contrast situations, as shown in the examples below.

Chromatic Aberrations 1 (100% Crop)

Chromatic Aberrations 2 (100% Crop)

Macro

The Canon PowerShot G7 X has a good macro mode that allows you to focus on a subject that is 5cm away from the camera. The first image shows how close you can get to the subject (in this case a compact flash card). The second image is a 100% crop.

Macro

Macro (100% Crop)

Flash

The flash settings on the Canon Powershot G7 X are Auto, On, Auto Red-eye Reduction, Slow Synchro and Off. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Flash Off - Wide Angle (24mm)

Flash On - Wide Angle (24mm)

ISO 64 ISO 64
   

Flash Off - Telephoto (100mm)

Flash On - Telephoto (100mm)

ISO 64 ISO 64

And here are some portrait shots. As you can see, neither the Flash On or the Red-eye-Reduction settings caused any red-eye.

Flash On

Flash On (100% Crop)
   

Red-eye Reduction

Red-eye Reduction (100% Crop)

Night

The Canon Powershot G7 X's maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds and there's a Bulb mode too, which is great news if you're seriously interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 30 seconds at ISO 125.

Night

Night (100% Crop)

Anti Shake

The Canon Powershot G7 X has an anti-shake mechanism, which allows you to take sharp photos at slower shutter speeds than other digital cameras. To test this, we took 2 handheld shots of the same subject with the same settings. The first shot was taken with anti shake turned off, the second with it turned on.

Shutter Speed / Focal Length Anti-Shake Off (100% Crop) Anti-Shake On (100% Crop)
1/10th sec / 24mm
     
1/10th sec / 100mm

Dynamic Range Correction

The Dynamic Range Correction mode automatically takes three exposures of the same scene at different settings, then combines them in-camera to create a single image with greater dynamic range. Note that you need to mount the G7 X on a tripod or stable surface to avoid camera-shake.

Off

Auto

   

200%

 
 

Shadow Correction

The Shadow Correction mode improves the shadow areas of the image without impacting on the highlights.

Off

Auto

My Colors

The My Colors function menu option contains a range of colour options for tweaking the look of your images before shooting.

Off

Vivid

   

Neutral

Sepia

   

B/W

Positive Film

   

Lighter Skin Tone

Darker Skin Tone

   

Vivid Blue

Vivid Green

   

Vivid Red

 
 

Creative Filters

The Creative Filters shooting mode contains 10 different options to help spice up your images.

Off

High Dynamic Range

   

Nostalgic

Fish-Eye Effect

   

Miniature Effect

Toy Camera Effect

   

Background Defocus

Soft Focus

   

Monochrome

Super Vivid

   

Poster Effect

 
 

Sample Images

This is a selection of sample images from the Canon PowerShot G7 X camera, which were all taken using the 20 megapixel SuperFine JPEG setting. The thumbnails below link to the full-sized versions, which have not been altered in any way.

Sample RAW Images

The Canon PowerShot G7 X enables users to capture RAW and JPEG format files. We've provided some Canon RAW (CR2) samples for you to download (thumbnail images shown below are not 100% representative).

1/200s · f/5.6 · ISO 1600
Download Original

1/200s · f/2.8 · ISO 400
Download Original

1/250s · f/2.8 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/125s · f/2.8 · ISO 400
Download Original

1/800s · f/5.6 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/200s · f/2.8 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/200s · f/8 · ISO 200
Download Original

1/160s · f/4 · ISO 400
Download Original

1/800s · f/2.8 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/400s · f/4 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/160s · f/4 · ISO 200
Download Original

1/160s · f/2.8 · ISO 800
Download Original

1/13s · f/4 · ISO 125
Download Original

1/20s · f/4 · ISO 200
Download Original

1/40s · f/4 · ISO 400
Download Original

1/80s · f/4 · ISO 800
Download Original

1/160s · f/4 · ISO 1600
Download Original

1/320s · f/4 · ISO 3200
Download Original

1/640s · f/4 · ISO 6400
Download Original

1/1250s · f/4 · ISO 12800
Download Original

Sample Movie

This is a sample movie at the highest quality setting of 1920x1080 pixels at 60 frames per second. Please note that this 20 second movie is 86.2Mb in size.

Product Images

Canon PowerShot G7 X

Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Lens Extended

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Pop-up Flash

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 

Canon PowerShot G7 X

Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X

Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Image Displayed

 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Turned On
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Main Menu
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Function Menu
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Rear of the Canon PowerShot G7 X / Ring Function Menu
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Tilting LCD Screen
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Tilting LCD Screen
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Top of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Bottom of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Side of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Front of the Canon PowerShot G7 X
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Memory Card Slot
 
Canon PowerShot G7 X
Battery Compartment

Specifications

 

Image Sensor

Type

1.0 type back-illuminated CMOS

Effective Pixels

Approx. 20.2M (Aspect ratio 3:2) [14]

Total Pixels

Approx. 20.9M

Colour Filter Type

Primary Colour

Low-Pass Filter

Built-in/Fixed with fluorine coating

Sensor Cleaning

EOS integrated cleaning system

Colour Filter Type

Primary Colour

Image Processor

Type

DIGIC 6 with iSAPS technology

Lens

Focal Length

8.8 – 36.8 mm (35 mm equivalent: 24 – 100 mm)

Zoom

Optical 4.2x

ZoomPlus 8.4x

Digital Approx. 4x (with Digital Tele-Converter approx. 1.6x or 2.0x [1])

Combined approx. 17x

Maximum f/number

f/1.8-f/2.8

Construction

11 elements in 9 groups (1 double sided aspherical lens, 1 single sided aspherical UA lens, 1 single sided aspherical lens and 1 UD lens)

Image Stabilisation

Yes (lens shift-type), approx. 3-stop [13]. Intelligent IS with 5-axis Enhanced Dynamic IS

Focusing

Type

TTL

AF System/ Points

AiAF (31-point, Face Detection or Touch AF with Object and Face Select and Track), 1-point AF (any position is available or fixed centre)

AF Modes

Single, Continuous, Servo AF/AE [6], Touch AF

AF Point Selection

Size (Normal, Small)

AF Lock

Yes, via customisable buttons

AF Assist Beam

Yes

Manual Focus

Yes, plus MF Peaking

Focus Bracketing

Yes

Closest Focusing Distance

5 cm (Wide) from front of lens

40 cm (Tele) from front of lens

Manual Focus

Selected on lens

Focus Bracketing

AF Microadjustment

AF Menu

+/- 20 steps (wide and tele setting for Zooms)

Adjust all lenses by same amount

Adjust up to 40 lenses individually

Adjustments remembered for lens by serial number

Exposure Control

Metering modes

Evaluative (linked to Face Detection AF frame), Centre-weighted average, Spot (centre or linked to Touch AF frame)

AE Lock

Yes, via customisable buttons

Exposure Compensation

+/- 3 EV in 1/3 stop increments

Manual and automatic dynamic range correction

Automatic shadow correction

ND Filter (3-stop)

AEB

1/3 – 2 EV in 1/3 stop increments

ISO Sensitivity

125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, 500, 640, 800, 1000, 1250, 1600, 2000, 2500, 3200, 4000, 5000, 6400, 8000, 10000, 12800 [15]

AUTO ISO: 125 - 12800 (possible to set Max. ISO speed and rate of change)

Shutter

Speed

1 – 1/2000 sec. (factory default)

250 – 1/2000 sec. (total range – varies by shooting mode)

Speed

30-1/8000 sec (1/2 or 1/3 stop increments), Bulb (Total shutter speed range. Available range varies by shooting mode)

White Balance

Type

TTL

Settings

Auto (including Face Detection WB), Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Tungsten, Fluorescent, Fluorescent H, Flash, Underwater, Custom 1, Custom 2

Multi-area WB correction available in Smart Auto

White Balance Compensation

White Balance Compensation in Underwater mode

Colour adjustment in Star mode

Custom White Balance

Yes, 1 setting can be registered

WB Bracketing

+/-3 levels in single level increments

3 bracketed images per shutter release.

Selectable Blue/Amber bias or Magenta/ Green bias.

Colour Matrix

Type

sRGB

Coverage (Vertical/Horizontal)

Approx. 100%

Magnification

Approx. 1.0x(4)

Eyepoint

Approx. 22mm (from eyepiece lens centre)

Dioptre Correction

-3 to +1 m-1 (dioptre)

Focusing Screen

Interchangeable (3 types, optional).

Standard Focusing Screen Eh-A

Super Precision Matte Eh-S II

Mirror

Quick-return half mirror (Transmission: reflection ratio of 40:60, no mirror cut-off with EF600mm f/4 or shorter)

Viewfinder Information

AF information: Single/Spot AF points, AF Frame, AF status, Focus indicator, AF mode, AF point selection, AF point registration

Exposure information: Shutter speed, aperture value, ISO speed (always displayed), AE lock, exposure level/compensation, flash metering, spot metering circle, exposure warning, AEB, metering mode, shooting mode

Flash information: Flash ready, high-speed sync, FE lock, flash exposure compensation, red-eye reduction light.

Image information: Card information, maximum burst (2 digit display), Highlight tone priority (D+).

Composition information: Grid, Electronic level

Other information: Battery check, Warning symbol, Flicker Detection, drive mode, white balance, JPEG/RAW indicator"

Depth of field preview

Yes, with Depth of Field preview button.

Eyepiece shutter

On strap

LCD Monitor

Monitor

Tilt type 7.5 cm (3.0”) sRGB PureColor II G Touchscreen LCD (TFT). 3:2 aspect ratio. Approx. 1,040,000 dots. Capacitive type

Coverage

Approx. 100%

Brightness

Adjustable to one of five levels. Quick-bright LCD

Coating

Anti-reflection and Solid Structure

Brightness Adjustment

Auto: Using extenal ambient light sensor

Manual: Adjustable to one of seven levels

Display Options

  1. Quick Control Screen
  2. Camera settings
  3. Dual Axis Electronic Level

Flash

Modes

Auto, Manual Flash On / Off, Slow Synchro

Slow Sync Speed

Yes. Fastest speed 1/2000 sec.

Red-Eye Reduction

Yes

Flash Exposure Compensation

+/- 2 EV in 1/3 stop increments. Face Detection FE, Safety FE, Smart Flash Exposure

Flash Exposure Lock

Yes

Manual Power Adjustment

3 levels with internal flash

Second Curtain Synchronisation

Yes

Built-in Flash Range

50 cm – 7.0 m (W) / 40 cm – 4.0 m (T)

External Flash

Canon High Power Flash HF-DC2

Second Curtain Synchronisation

Yes

HotShoe/ PC terminal

Yes/ Yes

External Flash Compatibility

E-TTL II with EX series Speedlites, wireless multi-flash support

External Flash Control

Via camera menu screen

Shooting

Modes

Smart Auto (58 scenes detected), Program AE, Shutter priority AE, Aperture priority AE, Manual, Custom, Hybrid Auto, Creative Shot, SCN (Portrait, Smart Shutter (Smile, Wink Self-Timer, FaceSelf-Timer), Star (Star Nightscape, Star Trails, Star Portrait, Star Time-Lapse Movie), Handheld Night Scene, Underwater, Snow, Fireworks), Creative Filters (High Dynamic Range, Nostalgic, Fish-eye Effect, Miniature Effect, Toy Camera Effect, Background Defocus, Soft Focus, Monochrome, Super Vivid, Poster Effect), Movie

Modes in Movie

Smart Auto (21 scenes detected), Standard, Program AE, Manual, Portrait, Nostalgic, Miniature Effect, Monochrome, Super Vivid, Poster Effect, Underwater, Snow, Fireworks, iFrame Movie

Photo Effects

My Colors (My Colors Off, Vivid, Neutral, Sepia, Black & White, Positive Film, Lighter Skin Tone, Darker Skin Tone, Vivid Blue, Vivid Green, Vivid Red, Custom Color)

Drive modes

Single, Auto Drive, Continuous, Continuous with AF, Self-Timer

Continuous Shooting

Approx. 6.5 shots/sec for up to 692 frames [12]

with AF: Approx. 4.4 shots/sec [3][4]

with Live View: Approx. 4.4 shots/sec [3][4]

Intervalometer

Built-in, number of shots selectable from 1-99 or unlimited. Bulb timer possible

Recording Pixels / Compression

Image Size

3:2 - (RAW, L) 5472 x 3648, (M1) 4320 x 2880, (M2) 2304 x 1536, (S) 720 x 480

4:3 - (RAW, L) 4864 x 3648, (M1) 3840 x 2880, (M2) 2048 x 1536, (S) 640 x 480

16:9 - (RAW, L) 5472 x 3080, (M1) 4320 x 2432, (M2) 1920 x 1080, (S) 720 x 408

1:1 - (RAW, L) 3648 x 3648, (M1) 2880 x 2880, (M2) 1536 x 1536, (S) 480 x 480

4:5 - (RAW, L) 2912 x 3648, (M1) 2304 x 2880, (M2) 1232 x 1536, (S) 384 x 480

Resize in playback (M2, S)

Compression

RAW, Superfine, Fine

Movies

(Full HD) 1920 x 1080, 60 fps / 30 fps

(HD) 1280 x 720, 30 fps

(L) 640 x 480, 30 fps

Star Time-Lapse Movie (Full HD) 30 fps / 15 fps

Miniature Effect (HD, L) 6 fps, 3 fps, 1.5 fps

Hybrid Auto (HD) 30 fps

iFrame Movie (Full HD) 30 fps

Movie Length

(Full HD & HD) Up to 4 GB or 29 min. 59 sec. [7]

(L) Up to 4 GB or 1 hour [4]

(Star Time-Lapse Movie) up to 128 sec

Metering

Real-time evaluative metering with image sensor

Active metering time can be changed

Display Options

Grid overlay (x2), Histogram

File Types

Still Image Type

JPEG compression (Exif 2.3 [Exif Print] compliant) / Design rule for Camera File system and DPOF ver. 1.1 compliant), RAW, RAW+JPEG

Movies

MP4 [Video: MPEG-4 AVC / H.264, Audio: MPEG-4 AAC-LC (stereo)]

iFrame

Image Size

JPEG 3:2: (L) 5472x3648, (M) 3648x2432, (S1) 2736x1824, (S2) 1920x1280, (S3) 720x480

JPEG 4:3: (L) 4864x3648, (M) 3248x2432, (S1) 2432x1824, (S2) 1696x1280, (S3) 640x480

JPEG 16:9: (L) 5472x3072, (M) 3648x2048, (S1) 2736x1536, (S2) 1920x1080, (S3) 720x408

JPEG 1:1: (L) 3648x3648, (M) 2432x2432, (S1) 1824x1824, (S2) 1280x1280, (S3) 480x480

RAW: (RAW) 5472x3648, (M-RAW) 4104x2736, (S-RAW) 2736x1824"

Movie Type

MOV (Video: H.264 or MP4: Intra frame / inter frame, Sound: Linear PCM with H.264, AAC with MP4, recording level can be manually adjusted by user)

Movie Size

1920 x 1080 (59.94, 50 fps) inter-frame

1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 fps) intra or inter frame

1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25) lite inter-frame

1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps) intra or inter frame

1280 x 720 (29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 fps) lite inter-frame

640 x 480 (29.97, 25 fps) inter-frame or inter-frame lite

Movie Length

Max duration 29min 59sec

Sound Files

Folders

New folders can be manually created and selected

File Numbering

Consecutive numbering

Auto reset

Manual reset

Direct Print

Canon Printers

Canon SELPHY Compact Photo Printers and Canon Inkjet Printers supporting PictBridge

PictBridge

Yes (via USB or Wireless LAN)

Other Features

GPS

GPS via mobile (linked to a compatible smartphone)

Red-Eye Correction

Yes, during shooting and playback

My Camera / My Menu

My Menu customisation available

My Category

Image tagging feature

Intelligent Orientation Sensor

Yes

Histogram

Yes, live histogram

Playback zoom

Approx. 2x – 10x

Self Timer

Approx. 2 or 10 sec., Custom

Menu Languages

English, German, French, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Italian, Greek, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Spanish, Ukrainian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Turkish, Simplified Chinese, Chinese (traditional), Japanese, Korean, Thai, Arabic, Romanian, Farsi, Hindi, Malay, Indonesian, Vietnamese, Hebrew

Histogram

Brightness: Yes

RGB: Yes

Highlight Alert

Yes

Image Erase/Protection

Erase: Single image, All images in folder, Checkmarked images, unprotected images

Protection: Erase protection of one image at a time

Menu Categories

  1. Shooting menu (x6)
  2. AF Menu (x5)
  3. Playback menu (x3)
  4. Setup menu (x4)
  5. Custom Functions menu (x5)
  6. My Menu

Menu Languages

25 Languages: English, German, French, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Spanish, Greek, Russian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Turkish, Arabic, Thai, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean and Japanese

Firmware Update

Update possible by the user.

Interface

Computer

Hi-Speed USB (MTP, PTP) DIGITAL connector

Other

HDMI Micro Connector

A/V output (PAL/NTSC)

Computer/Other

Wireless LAN (IEEE802.11b/g/n), (2.4 GHz only), with NFC support [11]

Memory Card

Type

SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS Speed Class 1 compatible)

PictBridge

Yes

Supported Operating System

PC & Macintosh

Windows 8 / 8.1 / 7 SP1

Mac OS X 10.8 / 10.9

 

For Wi-Fi connection to a PC:

Windows 8 / 8.1 / 7 SP1

Mac OS X 10.8.2 or later / 10.9

Software

Browsing & Printing

ImageBrowser EX

Other

CameraWindow

PhotoStitch

Map Utility

Image Manipulation

Digital Photo Professional for RAW development

Power Source

Batteries

Rechargeable Li-ion Battery NB-13L (battery and charger supplied)

Battery life

Approx. 210 shots

Eco mode approx. 310 shots

Approx. 240 min. playback

A/C Power Supply

Optional, AC Adapter Kit ACK-DC110

Other

PhotoStitch, EOS Utility (inc. Remote Capture, WFT utility*), Picture Style Editor

* Requires optional accessory

Accessories

Cases / Straps

Soft Case DCC-1870

PowerShot Accessory Organizer

Waterproof / Weatherproof Case

Waterproof Case (40m) WP-DC54

Flash

Canon High Power Flash HF-DC2

Power Supply & Battery Chargers

AC Adapter Kit ACK-DC110, Battery Charger CB-2LHE

Other

Interface cable IFC-400PCU

Canon AV cable AVC-DC400ST

Physical Specifications

Operating Environment

0 – 40 °C, 10 – 90% humidity

Dimensions (WxHxD)

103.0 x 60.4 x 40.4 mm

Weight

Approx. 304 g (including battery and memory card)

Weight (body only)

Approx. 910 g

Accessories

Viewfinder

Eyecup Eb, E-series Dioptric Adjustment Lens with Rubber Frame Eb, Focusing Screens Eh (Eh-A Standard Focusing Screen, Eh-S Super Precision Matte), Angle Finder C

Wireless File Transmitter

Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E5 version 2

Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E5 requires a firmware update and Interface Cable IFC-40AB II or IFC-150AB II

Compatible with Eye-Fi cards

Lenses

All EF and EF-S lenses

Flash

Canon Speedlites (90EX, 220EX, 270EX, 270EX II, 320EX, 420EX, 430EX, 430EX II, 550EX, 580EX, 580EX II, 600EX, 600EX-RT, Macro-Ring-Lite, MR-14EX II, Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX, Speedlite Transmitter ST-E2, Speedlite Transmitter ST-E3-RT)

Battery Grip

BG-E16

Remote Controller/ Switch

Remote control with N3 type contact, Wireless Controller LC-5, Remote Controller RC-6

Other

Hand Strap E2

All data is based on Canon standard testing methods except where indicated.

Subject to change without notice.

[1] Depending on the image size selected.

[3] Under conditions where the flash does not fire.

[4] Depending on memory card speed / capacity / compression setting.

[6] Some settings limit availability.

[7] The following Speed Class memory cards are required for maximum record time: (HD) 1280 x 720 Speed Class 4 or above. (Full HD) 1920 x 1080 Speed Class 6 or above. (iFrame) 1280 x 720 Speed Class 6 or above.

[11] Wi-Fi use may be restricted in certain countries or regions. Wi-Fi support varies by device and region. For more information visit www.canon.co.uk/wirelesscompacts.

[12] Sustained continuous shooting function requires compatible SDHC/SDXC UHS Speed Class 1 memory card, total number of frames captured varies depending on shooting subject.

[13] Values at maximum optical focal length. Cameras whose focal length exceeds 350 mm (35 mm equivalent) are measured at 350 mm.

[14] Image processing may cause a decrease in the number of pixels.

[15] ISO sensitivity denotes Recommended Exposure Index.

1 Large/Fine(Quality 8) resolution

2 Based on Canon's testing conditions, JPEG, ISO 100, Standard Picture Style. Maximum fps and buffer capacity may be reduced depending on the cameras settings, light level, subject, memory card brand and capacity, image recording quality, ISO speed, drive mode, Picture Style, Custom functions etc.

4 with 50mm lens at infinity, -1m-1 dpt

5 Based on the CIPA Standard and using the battery supplied with the camera, except where indicated

7 with EF300mm f/2.8L IS USM at 50kph

8 Recommended Exposure Index

10 Figures quoted are when used with UDMA7 class cards and with iTR AF feature disabled. When iTR AF is enabled, continuous shooting has a maximum rate of approx. 9.5fps

11 The number of cross-type AF points depends on the lens used

Conclusion

The new Canon PowerShot G7 X is an excellent pocket camera for enthusiast photographers, offering a wealth of options for shooting both still and video, excellent image quality, speedy auto-focusing, intuitive and configurable handling, and solid construction. It can't quite match the bigger and heavier G1 X Mk II in terms of performance at higher ISO speeds, but it does offer most of that camera's functionality in a smaller package, and even out-performs it in some areas.

In terms of the direct competition, the Canon PowerShot G7 X has definitely made a big leap forwards. Compared to the very popular Sony Cyber-shot RX100 Mk III, it's a very close-run thing, with the lack of a viewfinder (or any way of fitting an external one) on the G7 X being the biggest single reason to choose the Sony model for the keen photographer. If you don't need this feature, then the touchscreen capabilities of the G7 X are very compelling, as is the longer lens range, although the Sony RX100 Mk III's screen can be tilted both up and down. For us, the built-in EVF gives the Sony model the edge, but your mileage may vary according to which features you most value. Both are equally worthy of consideration.

The G7 X's image quality is excellent for a compact camera thanks to the 1-inch sensor that lies at its heart. If you've ever wanted DSLR-like pictures from a fixed-lens camera, then look no further than the G7 X, with its fast f/1.8-2.8 lens creating very nice bokeh at both ends of the versatile zoom range when shooting wide-open. Sure, it still can't match a DSLR or an APS-C equipped compact system camera at the higher ISO speeds, but ISO 100-1600 is eminently usable with 3200 as a backup, not something that you can say about many compacts.

In terms of build quality and handling, the Canon PowerShot G7 X gets most things right, offering a reassuringly rugged metal chassis and a plethora of customisable controls, including the lens control ring and exposure compensation dial, while the tilting touchscreen LCD, folding pop-up flash and 31-point AF system are all great features.

Canon have definitely caught up with the competition with the launch of the PowerShot G7 X. It offers the best balance between portability and functionality of any PowerShot camera to date, and is a serious rival to the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 Mk III. Highly Recommended!

4.5 stars

Ratings (out of 5)
Design 5
Features 4.5
Ease-of-use 4.5
Image quality 4.5
Value for money 4.5

Main Rivals

Listed below are some of the rivals of the Canon PowerShot G7 X.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II Review thumbnail

The Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II is a serious compact camera with a large 1.5-inch image sensor and fast 5x zoom lens. The G1 X Mk II also offers built-in wi-fi/NFC connectivity, 1080p HD video at 30fps with stereo sound, a 3 inch tilting touchscreen LCD, dual lens control rings, RAW files and a full range of manual shooting modes. Read our Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II review to find out if it's worth the £799 / €949 / $799.99 asking price...

Canon PowerShot S120

Canon PowerShot S120 Review thumbnail

The Canon PowerShot S120 is a new compact camera for enthusiasts. Featuring a 5x zoom lens with a fast maximum aperture of f/1.8, ISO range of 80-12,800, 12.1fps burst shooting, RAW support, full manual controls, built-in wi-fi connectivity, touchscreen interface and 1080p video at 60fps, the Canon S120 is a slim and stylish camera that you can easily fit in a trouser pocket. Read our in-depth Canon PowerShot S120 review now to find out if it's the best premium compact camera...

Fujifilm X30

Fujifilm X30 Review thumbnail

The Fujifilm X30 is a brand new premium compact camera with a large 2/3-type 12 megapixel sensor, fast 4x optical zoom lens, electronic viewfinder, tilting LCD screen, built-in wi-fi and a 60p movie mode. Read our Fujifilm X30 review, complete with full-size sample JPEG and raw images, videos and more...

Nikon Coolpix P340

Nikon Coolpix P340 Review thumbnail

The Nikon Coolpix P340 is a new compact camera for the keen enthusiast. The Nikon P340 features a 12.2 megapixel BSI CMOS sensor, full manual controls, lens control ring, 1080p HD video recording, a 5x wide-angle zoom lens with a fast maximum aperture of f/1.8, a high-resolution LCD screen, built-in wi-fi and 10fps burst shooting. Read our in-depth Nikon Coolpix P340 review to find out if it's the perfect pocket camera...

Olympus XZ-2

Olympus XZ-2 Review thumbnail

The new Olympus XZ-2 is a serious compact that's aimed at the enthusiast and professional user looking for a small yet capable camera. A 12 megapixel 1/1.7 inch CMOS sensor, fast f/1.8 maximum aperture, high-res 3-inch tilting touch-screen LCD, and a full range of manual shooting modes should be enough to grab your attention. Read our expert Olympus XZ-2 review, complete with full-size JPEG, RAW and movie samples.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review thumbnail

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is a premium compact camera like no other. The LX100 features a large Micro Four Thirds sensor, 4K video recording, fast 24-75mm lens, class-leading electronic viewfinder, all in a camera that you can fit in a jacket pocket. Read our in-depth Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 review with sample JPEG, RAW and video files to find out just what this exciting new camera is capable of...

Pentax MX-1

Pentax MX-1 Review thumbnail

The Pentax MX-1 joins the growing list of premium compact cameras aimed at advanced users. Offering a large 1/1.7" 12 megapixel sensor, fast f/1.8 4x zoom lens, tilting 3-inch LCD screen and an appealingly retro design, does the Pentax MX1 offer enough to compete in this increasingly competitive market? Read our detailed Pentax MX-1 review to find out...

Samsung EX2F

Samsung EX2F Review thumbnail

The Samsung EX2F is a new pocket camera for serious photographers, sporting a super-bright f/1.4, 3.3x zoom lens, sensible 12 megapixel sensor and a swivelling 3 inch AMOLED screen. 1080p video, RAW shooting, ISO 80-12800, 10fps burst shooting, image stabilisation and full manual controls complete the EX2F's star attractions. Read our Samsung EX2F review to find out if this is the advanced compact camera for you...

Sigma DP2 Quattro

Sigma DP2 Quattro Review thumbnail

The Sigma DP2 Quattro is a new serious compact camera featuring an intriguing 39 megapixel APS-C sensor from Foveon and a fixed 45mm equivalent lens with a fast aperture of f/2.8. Read our in-depth Sigma DP2 Quattro review to find out what this unique camera is capable of...

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review thumbnail

Big sensor - check. Fast lens - check. Built-in viewfinder - check. Tilting LCD screen - check. Wi-fi and NFC - check. Advanced video options - check. Is the new Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III the ultimate compact camera? Read our expert Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II review to find out...

Review Roundup

Reviews of the Canon PowerShot G7 X from around the web.

techradar.com »

The PowerShot G7 X is designed for photographers who want the power, control and even the image quality of a D-SLR, but in a camera small enough to fit in a pocket.
Read the full review »

cameralabs.com »

Canon's PowerShot G7X is a high-end compact based around a 20 Megapixel 1in sensor and a 24-100mm f1.8-2.8 lens. Announced in September 2014, the G7X slots roughly between the G1 X Mark II and S120 in terms of sensor size, delivering a step-up in quality over the latter, but with a body that's crucially smaller than the former. It's a strategy that's worked well for Sony's RX100 series, the leader in this category.
Read the full review »

uk.pcmag.com »

It took more than three years for another company to bring out a camera that went toe-to-toe with Sony's excellent RX100 series of compacts in terms of specifications and features. The Canon PowerShot G7 X ($699.99) is the first pocketable compact with a 1-inch sensor not to bear the Sony brand name.
Read the full review »

pocket-lint.com »

The rise of the high-end compact camera has been gathering pace, with oodles of models well worth a look in 2014. Despite already offering plenty of quality products, it's taken Canon a little longer to get into the groove and deliver a large-sensor yet small-size compact. Which is exactly where the PowerShot G7 X fits into the equation.
Read the full review »

Your Comments

16 Comments | Newest Oldest First | Post a Comment

#1 goli

i own the G7X a week (till now canon PS S 100)and agree fully with this review (in opposit to some Sony-enthusiastic fans)
The main thing to discuss is the softness in AUTO-mode. I use the P-mode with sharpening and minimal colour-correction.
Astonishing: the digitalconverter (1.6 or 2x) is doing well. Very good: many ways to get direct control with extra dials or customized menues.
Hint: minimum SD-card class 10 80MB for serials and 60p-videos.

2:03 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#2 Brad

Looks good for a Highly Recommended rating, but the RX100 III gets Essential with better IQ.

3:21 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#3 Kurt

Sorry but 4.5 Stars for the Image Quality? The samples are extremly noisy from ISO 125 to ISO 2500. I’m realy disapointed about the Quality.

The difference to a RX100 is huge.

What i want is the GX7 with the image quality of the Sony.

4:56 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#4 Paul

Extremely noisy? Are you looking at the right image? Cleaned your glasses?

6:33 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#5 Barnet

The ease of use page is a incomplete mess
The continuous framerate in RAW is 1 fps.
and that’s without AF. with AF it’s a 0,8 fps.

Then the shot to shot time reported by DPreview was a astonishingly slow 2 seconds. That means you will miss important shots due a locked camera.

The competition do not have these slow quirks. Check the link below for reference.

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/canon-powershot-g7-x/6

7:32 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#6 Henrik

This review sounds very superficial. That impression deepens, when, in this Canon review, i read:

“The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has 2 different JPEG image quality settings available, with Fine being the highest quality option…”

Elsewhere, you talk about greater depth of field when i reckon you mean shallower depth of field.

These flaws are not the ones that brought up my initially mentioned impression.

This is not a plug for my proofreading services.

10:17 pm - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

#7 Dave

I am glad Canon added this to their G-camera lineup.  Maybe this will finally prod Sony into adding a touchscreen to their version. 

Camera enthusiasts understand the laws of physics, but we forget them when we read camera reviews.  The only way to get an F2.8 zoom on a lens this small is to digitally remove the distortion. 

Digital correction introduces other common problems.  Fortunately, you have to zoom in on the pixels (or cook down your jpg images) to see them. 

Personally, I like the digital correction in the G7x and also in the Sony (which seems to use the same sensor).  It allows me to carry a camera in a phone holster that would otherwise require a backpack.

9:37 am - Wednesday, October 22, 2014

#8 Markus

As an “only” camera, the G7X packs an enticing degree of imaging prowess, two stops deeper to 1600 ISO, compared to the 400 ISO limit on the 2/3-ish segment when the particular competitor matches aperture. Would I rather shell out a bit more for the RX100-iii to get the EVF? I might. Would I pay for an EVF later if the G7X had a shoe? Probably not. You will miss it, but not everyday. Positioned in second fiddle, er camera, you won’t miss the EVF one bit, and your opinion will shift the G7X into the excellent category. On the way out the door, you will think about your venue’s available light and leave the bigger camera home much of the time.

11:12 am - Wednesday, October 22, 2014

#9 Autolycus

Could this be Canon’s most complete compact? Almost.
Will I buy one, with all its bells and whistles and fast f/1.8 lens and 1” (Sony?), sensor? Probably.  Would I rather have the G8X that Canon must already have on the drawing board, with a pop-up EVF where the flash now is, an LED ring-flash around the lens and a pair of AA batteries providing a bigger & better grip area on the starboard side? You betcha.
Come on Canon - you’re almost there…!

3:10 am - Thursday, October 23, 2014

#10 Markus

Why wait for Canon? A built in EVF and a sensor with excellent 3200 ISO can already be had in the LX100. Canon will have to fix the G1X-MkII first.

4:32 am - Thursday, October 23, 2014

#11 hdvhdv

For sake of clarity this camera has the Sony ‘1 sensor inside i.o.w. same sensor as the RX100MkIII
Any image quality difference shooting RAW, can only be the result of the lens. Which is a pretty good piece of glassaccording to other reviews.
I would still go for the RX100 as the EVF is for me a big must.

7:55 am - Thursday, October 23, 2014

#12 pinktech

There’s a lot of good here, but there are too many really sloppy errors for me to make a decision based on this review. The already pointed out Panasonic capabilities, several occasions of mismatched grammar and vocabulary, and, my favorite, the GX7’s ability to use the full range of Canon’s EF and EF-S lens, Speedlites and other EOS accessories. It’s a high-end point and shoot, but it isn’t that high-end.

I am not an English language or a grammar nut, but if there are so many obvious errors in the write up, I have to wonder what might have been glossed over or completely muffed in the testing itself.

3:12 pm - Saturday, October 25, 2014

#13 rejestrator

Hello my friends!
Pls look into the specs section of the review and correct all the mysterious features that came from a DSLR testing (sensor cleaning, interchangeable lenses, quick-return mirror).
Have a nice day!

10:09 am - Friday, November 21, 2014

#14 Charlie

I purchased this camera and am very disappointed with the IQ and the noise in all images. Will be trading it in for the Sony rx100III

2:58 pm - Saturday, January 3, 2015

#15 Theo

I suspect that some of the comments here are by people who don’t quite understand how to use this camera.

I sold my DSLR and got the G7X mainly for the sake of portability. Suffice to say, I am very impressed with this camera. Sure, it doesn’t have quite the fast burst rate as I’d like, nor does it have an EVF…but those are features that you can do without if you know how to use it properly. The image quality is great, not quite the same level as a DSLR, but so close in fact that the images are of good enough quality to be used in print publication (which mine are).

A little tip to add further versatility to this great little cam, get yourself a 52mm MagFilter, which will allow you to attach 52mm filters. It’s great to have such a small camera and still be able to get creative with VND, CPL and Grad filters.

2:47 pm - Thursday, November 5, 2015

#16 Cameron Longshaw

It’s a shame Canon didn’t put 24fps into this camera.

3:22 pm - Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Entry Tags

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