Carrying Systems Review

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March 29, 2012 | Matt Grayson | Accessory Reviews |

Lensloop

That is until you see the Lensloop. Lensloop are another company that have started off using the kind donations of investors on the Kickstarter website. The Lensloop is available at http://www.lensloop.com/ and costs $35.

It's essentially a length of seatbelt material such as what you'd find in a car. This has a high quality robust brass clip on it which fastens to a large D-ring.

Lensloop Attaching the Lensloop clip

The D-ring is attached to a tripod bush screw that fastens to the camera. The strap is easy enough to use as it's simply slung over a shoulder in the same way a messenger bag is. Or a seatbelt. The camera strap can be adjusted to hand height at your waist so it's easy to grab.

Lensloop Attaching the Lensloop to a camera

This strap is ideal for street photography shooters or going to an show/event such as the Goodwood Festival of Speed. - any place where a lot is going on and you need your camera quickly. Lensloop market the strap as “The smarter strap” and we're inclined to agree. It's effectiveness is in its simplicity. There's loads of room to get the camera up to your eye quickly to take a shot and the strap is variable in length for all people of all heights.

Lensloop Shooting with the Lensloop

Split Strap

The Split Strap is the third product in this test to gain backing through the Kickstarter project. The Split Strap is available at http://www.customslr.com/ and costs $28.95.

This product addresses the issue of a strap conforming to the body and distributing weight effectively. It appears that a simple slit in the centre of a wide camera strap is sufficient to do this. By adding this slit, it allows the two side of the strap to move independently and form to the photographer's shape.

Split Strap Fastening the Split Strap

It's an interesting idea and we felt no problems through our testing of the strap. Aside from the usual issues of strap use and their inherent discomfort, we found the Split Strap nice to wear on a day out. The straps also disconnect half way down so if you want to move away from the camera, you can and you don't have to have a heavy strap still attached to the camera. Of course this feature isn't new. We first saw it on the Lexar Professional strap back in 2007 and more companies have added this feature since.

The main part of the strap is made of bouncy neoprene for comfort and there are non-slip icons on the underside to avoid slippage. The neoprene joins to the connectors via a thick canvas section. The rest of the strap is traditional strap material and there are no D-rings, just string which is more like a shoelace material.

v Using the Split Strap

We can see this strap being used by photographers who move from location to location but use a tripod for a lengthy amount of time. If you're stood on a hill and it's windy, a strap blowing around could ruin the shot so removing it obviates the issue. It also adds weight to the back of the camera which could cause it to move on a tripod. Not good for long exposures so we think this is a good idea. The split will also help to ease the discomfort of carrying a camera around for a length of time.

Split Strap Unclipping the Split Strap

That concludes our look at four of the newer, more innovative carrying systems for photographers. If you can recommend another carrying system, please share it with everyone in the Comments section below.

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Ratings (out of 5)

Entry Tags

review, test, camera, carrying, Lensloop, carry, Spider Black Widow Holster, strap, Peak Design Capture, straps, camera carrying systems, Split Strap

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Your Comments

16 Comments | Newest Oldest First | Post a Comment

#1 Andrea Martinez

Thanks a lot for the review, but links in the article are wrong, as they all point to Peak Design website. You might want to correct it.
Cheers.

12:42 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#2 Colin Fenwick

The Carry Speed and Quick Strap are both variations of the Black Rapid approach and all three are great ways of carrying a camera, without the discomfort of a regular strap.

12:54 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#3 Gary W

I’m using the BosStrap one piece sling strap and so far I’m very happy with it.

http://www.bosstrap.com/

2:09 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#4 Andrew Lowery

I enjoyed the article but would like to see it improved. For example, there are two nice photos of the Lensloop rings but no photo of a camera hanging in the carrying position. May we have a photo of each system with the camera hanging in the carrying position? Likewise, do not block the view with your arms.  Thanks.

3:12 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#5 Vik

By clicking on customslr.com link it redirects u to pickdesign.com lol Error buddy!

4:35 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#6 Dave - Nature stock photos

I use a strap like the Lens loop, but connected to the strap eyelets on either side of the camera. Easy to use, disconnect, plus means I can keep an arca QR plate on the camera all the time. I can’t understand why these products are so expensive for just a strap?

7:48 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#7 steven guy

some carry speed strap can be agreat way to carry your camera but i just stick mine around me neck

11:16 pm - Thursday, March 29, 2012

#8 DaveAB

Thanks for the article! I don’t see too many carrying attachment comparison tests out there.

I have a Tamrac 514 bag. It’s large enough for a superzoom or a small DSLR. It feels a little awkward at first when attached to your belt, pressed against your leg, but is actually quite comfortable for long hikes or outdoor events. Plus it is padded and protects your camera. It is rigid enough that you can leave the top zipper open and be able to grab your camera and shoot in seconds.

11:54 am - Friday, March 30, 2012

#9 Adjuster

I second Gary W’s recommendation. I tried several variations of the Black Rapid strap, but could never keep the shoulder pad in place. Now I use the Boss strap, which works extremely well. Very comfortable after using it for a few hours. It is similar to the Lensloop except that it attached to the camera’s lug slot. This frees up the tripod socket.

1:26 pm - Friday, March 30, 2012

#10 Andy Chamberlayne

No review of the cottoncarrier ,, you kind missed the boat there mate

4:53 pm - Friday, March 30, 2012

#11 Boon Goh

A good review of the variety of systems in the market. Because of video shoots, I try to avoid systems with metal hardware with potential for noise. I’m trying out a CarrySpeed strap for my DSLR now. It connects to the tripod socket like other designs, but uses a ball-and-socket connector which doesn’t flop around to scrape/scratch camera body/lens, or jiggle to make noise when shooting video. Quite a comfy broad strap and great for fast cross-body use/adjustments too.
(I have no ties whatsoever with CarrySpeed, financial or otherwise)

5:09 pm - Friday, March 30, 2012

#12 DaveAB

Thanks for the article! I don’t see too many carrying attachment comparison tests out there.

I have a Tamrac model 514 bag. It’s large enough for a superzoom or a small DSLR. It feels a little awkward at first when attached to your belt, but is actually quite comfortable for long hikes or outdoor events. Plus it is padded and protects your camera. It is rigid enough that you can leave the top zipper open and be able to grab your camera and shoot in seconds.

10:01 am - Saturday, March 31, 2012

#13 Andreas

Anyone knows where to find Lens Loop in Europe? Thanks

10:04 pm - Monday, April 2, 2012

#14 ChrisU

Another fantastic strap is the Luma Cinch (luma-labs.com). Brilliant industrial design work, much more attention to detail and higher quality materials than other brands. Overall fit and finish is head and shoujlders above all other straps I’ve used.

Luma previously produced a strap called the Luma Loop (which I also own and absolutely love), but they were served a cease and desist order from Black Rapid who claimed that Luma was guilty of patent infringement. Frankly, I think they were just nervous about how much business they were losing to Luma; certainly there are any number of other companies producing very similar yet less successful products without Black Rapid threatening suit.

10:17 pm - Wednesday, April 4, 2012

#15 Adam

Adam from the Peak Design team here - thank you for reviewing the Capture Camera Clip System! I’d like to point out a few things about Capture that aren’t apparent in this article…

1. Capture was designed to be attached to more than just waist belts - it works superbly on backpack straps, messenger bags, camera backpacks, climbing harnesses, you name it.

2. When worn on the belt it will be most comfortable when worn close to the center of the body, not on the side of the hip as pictured. Check out the videos on our Usage Tips page: http://peakdesignltd.com/usage-tips.htm

3. If your camera has a battery grip (as pictured), we recommend using Capture with a Think Tank Belt for maximum comfort. We have images how how this killer combo works together on our Usage Tips page: http://peakdesignltd.com/usage-tips.htm

Thanks!
Adam

5:41 am - Tuesday, April 10, 2012

#16 dslr_man

The absolute best system I know of is the “Cotton Carrier System, http://www.cottoncarrier.com. It is super durable and I have used it and have TRIED to abuse it.

The hubs are hard anodized aluminum that are machined not dye cast

It uses 1680 Denier nylon, same stuff bullet proof vests are made from.

The buckles are all Nifco, they are the best buckle manufacturer, and clips are all fiberglass reinforced.

If anyone is looking for a great system that feels great on any kind of shoot then check out these guys. They’ve been amazing for me, I hope they are for you.

11:32 pm - Wednesday, July 11, 2012