Sony A7 II Review

March 4, 2015 | Mark Goldstein | |
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Review Roundup

Reviews of the Sony A7 II from around the web.

cameralabs.com »

Sony's Alpha A7 Mark II is the successor to the original A7 and becomes the fourth full-frame mirrorless camera in the series. Announced in November 2014 roughly one year after the first A7, it keeps the same 24 Megapixel resolution, adds a deeper grip, improves the AF tracking and most importantly becomes the first mirrorless camera from Sony with built-in image stabilisation that works with any lens you attach.
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blog.mingthein.com »

We now have no less than four full frame mirrorless options from Sony; the A7R (previously reviewed here); the A7, the A7S, and now the A7II. This appears to be typical Sony strategy: rather than making a product that’s a definite improvement on the previous model, we get many attempts hoping that each one will find its’ own niche. The A7II brings one thing that makes me curious enough to give it a try despite an uninspiring experience with its predecessor: the first full-frame mirrorless camera to have in body stabilization.
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thephoblographer.com »

Introduced late last year, Sony refreshed one of their initial entries into the full frame mirrorless camera game with the A7 Mk II. The Sony A7, to be honest, is such new technology still that it didn’t need a refresh. But Sony is one of the big innovators of our time in the camera world, so when it came to the A7 Mk II they gave it a couple of slight but well executed updates. Read more at http://www.thephoblographer.com/2015/01/19/review-sony-a7-mk-ii/#wX2iTvTpWOMWhFRi.99
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amateurphotographer.co.uk »

When we reviewed the original Sony A7 it left a number of lasting impressions. Not only was it seen as a game changer in the way it managed to shoehorn a full-frame sensor inside a such a compact body, the superb image quality it produced alongside its comprehensive specification made it stand out as an attractive proposition for those seeking a lighter and more compact substitute to a heavy and bulky DSLR.
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