Canon EOS 1000D Review
(also called the Canon Digital Rebel XS)

Review Date: August 6th 2008
Author: Mark Goldstein

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Page 1
Introduction / Ease of Use
Page 2
Image Quality
Page 3
Sample Images
Page 4
Design
Page 5
Specifications
Page 6
Conclusion

Conclusion


Ratings (out of 5)
Design
4.5
Features
4
Ease-of-Use
4.5
Image Quality
4.5
Value for Money
4

The EOS 1000D is a solid addition to Canon's extensive range of DSLR cameras, filling the gap at the sub-500 / $700, entry-level price-point. Canon have cleverly ensured that it's different enough to the more expensive 450D to tempt you to upgrade, yet still producing a very capable camera that suits its beginner target audience. Whilst 2 megapixels, 2 AF-points, 0.5 inch of LCD real-estate, lack of Highlight Tone Priority and no infra-red remote control are fairly significant differences, I really missed the Spot metering mode, larger viewfinder and faster RAW continuous shooting that the EOS 450D offers when compared to the 1000D.

Live View has made it onto the 1000D and is a great addition on paper, but don't expect a point-and-shoot experience as the contrast AF mode is infuriatingly slow, and the Quick AF mode is of most interest to macro and studio photographers. I much preferred the quicker, more seamless Live View mode of the Sony A350. The new EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS kit lens is actually more beneficial than Live View, providing much needed image stabilisation, although obviously Canon's system is still lens-dependent and therefore more restrictive than that of Sony, Pentax or Olympus (which instantly work with any lens).

Image quality is on a par with the EOS 450D, with noise-free images up to ISO 800 and a very usable fastest speed of 1600, so usable that I don't understand why the EOS 1000D doesn't also offer ISO 3200. Chromatic aberrations are kept to a minimum and colours are accurate - the only minor negative is the soft JPEG images, which may put off users more suited to sharper point and shoot cameras. Performance is also good, with no shutter-lag to speak of and fast processing times even when shooting in RAW single-shot mode. The 3.0fps continuous shooting mode for JPEGs is a little slower than the EOS 450D, but for RAW things take a turn for the worse, with the rate dropping to just 1.5fps for up to 5 shots, enough of a difference to consider the 450D if you predominantly shoot using the RAW format.

Compared to the likes of the Sony A200, Nikon D60 and Olympus E-420, the new 1000D offers a little more, but for a little more money - the street price was hovering at around 450 / $700 when writing this review, significantly more than its main competitors, although I'd expect a further price drop soon as the novelty wears off. The EOS 1000D is a worthy if slightly un-exciting addition to Canon's line-up, well suited to both beginners upgrading from a compact digicam and more experienced DSLR-owners looking for an inexpensive back-up body.

Page 1
Introduction / Ease of Use
Page 2
Image Quality
Page 3
Sample Images
Page 4
Design
Page 5
Specifications
Page 6
Conclusion

DIWAPhotographyBLOG is a member of the DIWA organisation. Our test results for the Canon EOS 1000D have been submitted to DIWA for comparison with test results for different samples of the same camera model supplied by other DIWA member sites.

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