Canon Powershot G7 Review

Date: December 21st 2006
Author: Gavin Stoker

Leave a Comment about this Review

Page 1
Introduction / Features
Page 2
Ease of Use
Page 3
Image Quality
Page 4
Sample Images
Page 5
Design
Page 6
Specifications
Page 7
Conclusion

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this Review were taken using the 10 megapixel Superfine quality mode, which gives an average image size of around 4Mb - 6Mb.

Noise

There are 7 ISO settings available on the Canon Powershot G7 which you can select at any time if the camera is in any of the creative shooting modes. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting. Disappointingly, but not unsurprisingly, image noise is readily visible in images taken above ISO 400, even when viewed at just 25%, leading me for the most part to steer well clear of ISO 1600 (or ISO 3200 selectable via the scene modes, unless you're aiming for a homage to the Impressionists).

ISO 80 (100% crop)

ISO 100 (100% crop)

   

ISO 200 (100% crop)

ISO 400 (100% crop)

   

ISO 800 (100% crop)

ISO 1600 (100% crop)

   

ISO 3200 (100% crop)

 
 

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web - Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images are a little soft at the default setting ideally and benefit from some further sharpening in a program like Adobe Photoshop. You can also change the in-camera sharpening level to suit your tastes via the My Colors menu option.

Original (100% crop)

Sharpened (100% crop)

   
   

Chromatic Aberrations

The Canon Powershot G7 dealt very well with chromatic aberrations well during the review. There's some slight fringing between areas of high contrast bright skies and foreground for example but it's only noticeable on really close inspection.

Chromatic Aberrations (100% crop)
Chromatic Aberrations (100% crop)
   

Macro

The Canon Powershot G7 offers a Macro setting that allows you to focus on a subject that is just 1cm away from the camera when the lens is set to wide-angle. The first image shows how close you can get to the subject (in this case a compact flash card). The second image is a 100% crop.

Macro Shot

Macro Shot (100% crop)

   

Flash

The flash settings on the Canon Powershot G7 are Auto, Manual Flash On / Off, Slow Sync Speed and Red-eye Reduction. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Flash Off - Wide Angle (35mm)

Auto Flash - Wide Angle (35mm)

ISO 64
ISO 64
   

Flash Off - Telephoto (210mm)

Auto Flash - Telephoto (210mm)
ISO 64
ISO 64
   

And here are some self-portrait shots. If you opt to use flash for portraits, it's difficult to completely avoid the effects of red eye (despite the camera's anti red-eye flash setting).

Flash On

Flash On (100% Crop)
   

Flash - Red-Eye Reduction

Flash - Red-Eye Reduction (100% Crop)
   

Night Shot

The Canon Powershot G7 maximum shutter speed is 15 seconds, which is great for night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 1/80 second, f/4 at ISO 800. I've included a 100% crop of the image to show what the quality is like.

Night Shot

Night Shot (100% crop)
   

Overall Image Quality

As you'd expect from such an enthusiast's model, images appear sharp, well exposed and crystal clear on the Canon Powershot G7 camera back and happily the same is true once downloaded to the desktop and examined in closer detail. There's no doubting that optical image stabilization is a real plus at the longer end of the zoom, meaning that any blurred images among my test shots were few and far between. The degree of highlight and shadow detail is also acceptable at this level. Disappointingly, but not unsurprisingly, image noise is readily visible in images taken above ISO 400, even when viewed at just 25%, leading me for the most part to steer well clear of ISO 1600 (or ISO 3200 selectable via the scene modes, unless you're aiming for a homage to the Impressionists). I somewhat compromised by flicking the dedicated dial to ISO 800 for our night time test shots, and got what I think are still usable if not the best results. Left on default, under daylight, the Canon G7's colours are vivid enough for my tastes, with reds, greens and blues nicely 'punchy'. Skin tones are warm and flatteringly healthy without being unrealistically so. There's some slight fringing between areas of high contrast bright skies and foreground for example but it's only noticeable on really close inspection, and certainly not on an A3 print, which is probably the largest size most of us would typically output. Overall the Canon G7 acquits itself very well in the area that counts the most.

Page 1
Introduction / Features
Page 2
Ease of Use
Page 3
Image Quality
Page 4
Sample Images
Page 5
Design
Page 6
Specifications
Page 7
Conclusion

DIWAPhotographyBLOG is a member of the DIWA organisation. Our test results for the Canon Powershot G7 have been submitted to DIWA for comparison with test results for different samples of the same camera model supplied by other DIWA member sites.

Compare Prices

Support PhotographyBLOG: Buy the Canon Powershot G7 from one of our affiliate retailers: