Nikon Coolpix S700 Review

Review Date: May 15th 2007
Author: Gavin Stoker

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Page 1
Introduction / Ease of Use
Page 2
Image Quality
Page 3
Sample Images
Page 4
Design
Page 5
Specifications
Page 6
Conclusion

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this Review were captured using the 12M (4000 x 3000) JPEG setting producing a file that is between 3.5-4.5Mb.

Noise

The Nikon Coolpix S700 has 8 ISO settings. Up to and including ISO 400 noise is well under control, becoming immediately obvious at ISO 800, and increasing notably at ISO 1600 and 2000 but not to such a degree that the image becomes throwaway. If noise appears less of a problem at ISO 3200, that's only because the camera's resolution has significantly dropped to five megapixels to compensate, detail smoothed out and lost in the process. Stick to ISO 400 and below and you'll be OK. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting.

ISO 64 (100% Crop)

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

   

ISO 2000 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

Sharpening

Here are two 100% crops which have been Saved as Web - Quality 50 in Photoshop. The right-hand image has had some sharpening applied in Photoshop. The out-of-the camera images at the default setting are just a little on the soft side and benefit from some further sharpening in a program like Adobe Photoshop. Alternatively you can change the in-camera sharpening level if you don't like the default results.

Original (100% Crop)

Sharpened (100% Crop)

   
   

Chromatic Aberrations

The Nikon Coolpix S700 handled chromatic aberrations very well during the review. Some limited purple green fringing was present around the edges of objects only in high-contrast situations and at the edges of the frame, as shown in the examples below.

Chromatic Aberrations (100% Crop)
Chromatic Aberrations (100% Crop)
   

Macro

The Nikon Coolpix S700 offers a Macro setting that allows you to focus on a subject that is 6cms away from the camera. The first image shows how close you can get to the subject in Macro mode (in this case a compact flash card). The second image is a 100% crop.

Macro Shot

Macro Shot (100% Crop)

   

Flash

The flash settings on the Nikon Coolpix S700 are Forced flash, Auto with Red-Eye Reduction, Anytime Flash, Flash Cancel, Redeye reduction with slow sync, and Slow sync. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Flash Off - Wide Angle (37mm)

Auto Flash - Wide Angle (37mm)

ISO 64
ISO 64
   

Flash Off - Telephoto (111mm)

Auto Flash - Telephoto (111mm)
ISO 64
ISO 64
   

And here are some portrait shots. As you can see, both the Flash On setting and the Red-Eye Reduction option caused a small amount of red-eye.

Flash On

Flash On (100% Crop)
   

Flash - Red-Eye Reduction

Flash - Red-Eye Reduction (100% Crop)
   

Night Shot

The Nikon Coolpix S700 maximum shutter speed is 4 seconds, which is not very good news if you're interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 0.5 second, aperture of f/2.8 at ISO 800. I've included a 100% crop of the image to show what the quality is like.

Night Shot

Night Shot (100% Crop)
   

Overall Image Quality

The Nikon Coolpix S700 looks beautiful, sure, but the images it takes lack punch and appear rather flat straight out of the camera colours are on occasion a little wishy-washy when the S700 is left to its default devices. Luckily there is a vivid colour option to provide a little more of a kick in-camera. Though the level of detail captured is more than respectable, its results don't appear all that different to those provided by an 8 megapixel sensor. Still, metering is accurate and exposures are commendably even, while any pixel fringing is well disguised. The softening effect of camera shake is also notably absent for the most part, which is undoubtedly another plus. As for noise levels when shooting interiors without flash up to and including ISO 400 it's well under control, becoming immediately obvious at ISO 800, and increasing notably at ISO 1600 and 2000 but not to such a degree that the image becomes throwaway. If noise appears less of a problem at ISO 3200, that's only because the camera's resolution has significantly dropped to five megapixels to compensate, detail smoothed out and lost in the process. Stick to ISO 400 and below and you'll be OK. So overall the image quality from the Nikon Coolpix S700 is about what we'd expect from this class of camera nothing more, nothing less, and there's little to really take issue with.

Page 1
Introduction / Ease of Use
Page 2
Image Quality
Page 3
Sample Images
Page 4
Design
Page 5
Specifications
Page 6
Conclusion

DIWAPhotographyBLOG is a member of the DIWA organisation. Our test results for the Nikon Coolpix S700 have been submitted to DIWA for comparison with test results for different samples of the same camera model supplied by other DIWA member sites.

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