Panasonic Lumix DMC-CM1 Review

February 16, 2015 | Mark Goldstein |

Review Roundup

Reviews of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-CM1 from around the web.

ephotozine.com »

The Panasonic Lumix CM1 is a new smartphone that Panasonic are calling the "World's slimmest communication camera" - it is designed and made by the digital camera division of Panasonic, and features the Lumix branding, as well as slotting into the "Premium compact camera" section on Panasonic's website. The camera is the first smartphone to use a large 1inch 20 megapixel sensor, and the lens is a 28mm f/2.8 Leica lens, the first time a Leica lens has been found on a smartphone.
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digitalversus.com »

For a good two years now, the mobile sector has been determined to see compact cameras dead and buried. It all began with the Nokia 808 PureView and Lumia 1020, the avant-garde of the "expert camera phone" movement. Even Samsung, the smartphone market leader, has tried to get in on the action, with its Galaxy Camera and K Zoom, an Android smartphone with optical zoom. And that's not to mention Apple's iPhone, which, thanks to some dedicated apps and the usual Apple quality, has managed to wind up in the pockets of some world-renowned photographers. But while these manufacturers battle it out, adding megapixel after megapixel, optical stabilisation and laser autofocus to their 1/3" sensors, a brand new to the smartphone arena has produced something that looks set to really shake things up. Introducing the Panasonic Lumix DMC-CM1.
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amateurphotographer.co.uk »

Thanks to a string of strong camera releases that included the Lumix DMC-GH4, the FZ1000 and the LX100, Panasonic had a very positive 2014, delivering good-quality cameras in multiple categories with some class-leading innovation. Not a brand to rest on its laurels, Panasonic has now created what it calls a ‘communication camera’ – a device that marries a fully functioning Android smartphone with a slim camera. The camera features a large 1in sensor, like those found in Sony’s RX100 series and the Canon G7 X.
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