Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV Review

December 3, 2020 | Mark Goldstein |

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 20 megapixel Fine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 8Mb, although the file sizes do vary.

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV produced images of excellent quality during the review period. It produces noise-free images at ISO 100 up to 1600, with limited noise starting to appear at ISO 3200.

ISO 6400 exhibits quite visible noise and loss of fine detail, and the fastest settings of ISO 12800 and 25600 are even noisier but still usable for small prints and web use. The corresponding raw files are inevitably more noisy at lower ISOs.

The image stabilisation system works excellently for both stills and video, even when hand-holding the camera at very slow shutter speeds.

The various Art Filters and Picture Styles produce special effects that would otherwise require you to spend a lot of time in the digital darkroom.

Noise

There are 9 ISO settings available on the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV. The base sensitivity is ISO 200, but there is an expanded low sensitivity setting equivalent to ISO 100. These crops demonstrate the image quality at each setting.

JPEG RAW

LOW / ISO 100 (100% Crop)

LOW / ISO 100 (100% Crop)

iso100.jpg iso100.jpg

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

iso200.jpg iso200raw.jpg

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

iso400.jpg iso400raw.jpg

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

iso800.jpg iso800raw.jpg

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600raw.jpg

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

iso3200.jpg iso3200raw.jpg

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

iso6400.jpg iso6400raw.jpg

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

iso12800.jpg iso12800raw.jpg

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

iso25600.jpg iso25600.jpg

File Quality

The file quality settings available on the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV include Normal, Fine and Superfine for JPEGs, and you can also shoot in Olympus’s proprietary ORF raw file format. Do note that the Superfine setting must first be enabled from the menu in order to appear among the selectable quality options.

SuperFine (100% Crop) Fine (100% Crop)
quality_superfine.jpg quality_fine.jpg
Normal (100% Crop) Raw (100% Crop)
quality_normal.jpg quality_raw.jpg

Flash

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV features a flash that has multiple modes including Forced On, Forced Off, Auto, Slow Sync, Rear-Curtain Sync and almost any of these combined with red-eye reduction.

It can also serve as an AF assist light or as a controller for wirelessly slaved FL-36R or FL-50R units.

In addition to the on-board unit, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV also has a hot-shoe for system flashes.

The pictures below were taken of a white wall from a distance of 1.5m, with and without the built-in flash.

Flash Off - Wide Angle

Flash On - Wide Angle

ISO 64 ISO 64

Flash Off - Telephoto

Flash On - Telephoto

ISO 64 ISO 64

And now for some portraits. The pop-up flash of the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV did not really cause a red-eye effect, so the only noticeable difference between the Forced On and Forced On with Red-Eye Reduction settings is that the second causes the subject's pupils to contract slightly.

Flash On

flash_on.jpg

Red-eye Reduction

flash_redeye.jpg

Night

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV offers exposure times as long as 60 second in a metered exposure or up to 30 minutes in bulb mode, which is excellent news for anyone seriously interested in night photography.

Live Bulb mode allows you to view the progression of exposure during a bulb exposure in real-time and a live view histogram shows how the exposure is built-up across all points of the image.

The following picture was taken at a shutter speed of 15 seconds, aperture of f/8 at ISO 200.

Night

HDR

In High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode, the camera takes a number of photos in rapid succession, at different exposure settings, and combines them into a single high-dynamic-range image. There are two options, HDR1 and HDR2. In our experience, HDR1 usually yields a credible image but HDR2 tends to produce flat, unrealistic results.

Off

HDR1

hdr_01.jpg hdr_02.jpg

HDR2

hdr_03.jpg

Art Filters

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV offers an extensive range of so-called ‘art filters', which allow you to quickly apply an artistic effect to a photo before taking it. Art filters are easily accessible via a dedicated setting on the shooting mode dial.

Pop Art

Soft Focus

art_filters_01.jpg art_filters_02.jpg

Pale&Light Color

Light Tone

art_filters_03.jpg art_filters_04.jpg

Grainy Film

Pin Hole

art_filters_05.jpg art_filters_06.jpg
Diorama Cross Process
art_filters_07.jpg art_filters_08.jpg
Gentle Sepia Dramatic Tone
art_filters_09.jpg art_filters_10.jpg
Key Line Watercolor
art_filters_11.jpg art_filters_12.jpg
Vintage Partial Color
art_filters_13.jpg art_filters_14.jpg
Bleach Bypass Instant Film
art_filters_15.jpg art_filters_16.jpg

Picture Modes

Olympus' Picture Modes are essentially pre-set combinations of saturation, contrast and sharpness, except for the i-Enhance mode that aims to optimise each photo individually. You can tailor each Picture Mode to your needs. The following examples demonstrate the differences across the available Picture Modes.

i-Enhance

Vivid

picture_modes_01.jpg picture_modes_02.jpg

Natural

Muted

picture_modes_03.jpg picture_modes_04.jpg

Portrait

Monotone

picture_modes_05.jpg picture_modes_06.jpg

Multiple Exposure

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV has a Multiple Exposure feature allowing you to combine multiple exposures to create a composite image in-camera.

picture_modes_03.jpg