Panasonic Lumix G100 Review

July 7, 2020 | Tim Coleman |

Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 20.3 megapixel Raw + Fine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 24Mb and 10.5Mb respectively.

The well-rated 20.3MP micro-four-thirds sensor in the Lumix G100 is a known quantity, being found in Panasonic's higher end micro-four-thirds cameras such as the G9, GH5 and G90.

In JPEG images, there is no real visible sign of noise within the sensitivity range of ISO 200 to ISO 25,600 all the way up to ISO 3200. That's an impressive performance.

The adverse impact of noise is starting to be seen at ISO 6400 through a minor colour desaturation smudged detail, especially in shadow areas. At ISO 12,800 we see the most notable decline in image quality. By and large, you'll want to avoid the top two settings of ISO 12,800 and 25,600 in order to enjoy clean and sharp detail.

Noise reduction in JPEG images is reasonable. In RAW files where no noise reduction is applied, noise is more evident but images still look pretty clean up to ISO 3200.

You're not short of choices when it comes to the look of pictures, but colour wise we find the 'Natural' Photo Style a reliable choice for a wide range of scenarios. Skin tones in portraits, sunny skies and landscape all rendered faithfully.

As for video image quality, it's a mixed bag. All of the Full HD 1080p video looks lovely, even the 120fps slow motion. Crisp, punchy and backed up with effective stabilisation.

Sadly, 4K video is a little bit of a let down. It's not oversampled, so any use of stabilisation (which is limited to the less effective 4-axis electronic stabilisation) introduces a crop of the 4K picture. The higher resolution does also make continuous AF wandering more noticeable than in 1080p. Overall, if you need AF or stabilisation, the 4K image is a little soft.

It's neat to see that the V-Log L colour profile is included on the Lumix G100, although 4K videos are 8-bit, rather than 10-bit, so you won't be able to enjoy the full potential in the same way as a camera like the GH5.

Noise

An eight-stop native sensitivity range covers ISO 200 to ISO 25,600, with the option to record in RAW and JPEG separately and simultaneously. Here are some 100% crops which show the levels of noise for each ISO setting.

JPEG Raw

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

iso200.jpg iso200.jpg

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

iso400.jpg iso400.jpg

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

iso800.jpg iso800.jpg

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600.jpg

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600.jpg

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600.jpg

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

ISO 12800 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600.jpg

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

ISO 25600 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600.jpg

Chromatic Aberrations

The Panasonic Lumix G100 handled chromatic aberrations very well during the review, with some purple fringing present around the edges of objects in high-contrast situations, as shown in the examples below.

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chromatic1.jpg

Macro

The Panasonic Lumix G100 allows you to focus on a subject that is 5cms away from the camera when the lens is set to wide-angle.

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Night

It's possible to manually control the shutter speed for single exposure times up to 60 seconds. Use the Scene mode and there are several options for night photography; Clear Nightscape, Cool Night Sky, Warm Glowing Nightscape, Artistic Nightscape, Handheld Night Shot, plus Clear Night Portrait.

night.jpg

Dynamic Range

To alter the amount of dynamic range captured in a single image, there are a few options; iDynamic, Shading Compensation, HDR, plus Exposure Bracketing.

In order to show how much dynamic range the G100 sensor is capable of recording, our test images here are taken with dynamic range modes off and then with HDR mode at its highest setting of +3EV. The images in the sample gallery are all taken with all those options switched off.

HDR combines multiple images for a single high dynamic range image up to +3EV, and the shots can be aligned. There's no IBIS, so unless you use an optically stabilised lens, HDR effectiveness may be limited when shooting handheld.

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Dynamic Range Optimiser HDR Off

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Dynamic Range Optimiser HDR +3EV

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Dynamic Range Optimiser HDR Off

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Dynamic Range Optimiser HDR +3EV

Photo Styles

For photography and video, there are 12 Photo Styles; standard, vivid, natural, mono, L.Mono, L.Mono D, Scenery, Portrait, Custom, CNED, CNEV and V-Log L. We really like the 'natural' photo style - it is a safe option for most situations. L.Mono looks great too.

Standard

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Vivid

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Natural

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Monochrome

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L Mono

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L Mono D

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Scenery

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Portrait

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Custom

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CNED

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CNEV

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V-Log L

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Filter Effects

There are 22 different Filter Effects and we've included all 22 of these effects in an identical image below. There is also a range of Scene modes.

Expressive

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Retro

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Old Days

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High Key

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Low Key

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Sepia

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Monochrome

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Dynamic Monochrome

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Rough Monochrome

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Silky Monochrome

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Impressive Art

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High Dynamic

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Cross Process

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Toy Effect

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Toy Pop

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Bleach Bypass

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Miniature Effect

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Soft Focus

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Fantasy

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Star Filter

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One Point Colour

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Sunshine

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