Panasonic Lumix TZ95 Review

April 16, 2019 | Gavin Stoker |

Panasonic Lumix TZ95 Image Quality

All of the sample images in this review were taken using the 20 megapixel Fine JPEG setting, which gives an average image size of around 7Mb.

You can squeeze a lot of subjects into the core 24-20mm equivalent lens reach provided by Panasonic’s TZ95 travel zoom, which, given that the camera otherwise delivers a relatively modest (read ‘small’) sized sensor, remains its biggest boon/draw. The quality of images is however pretty good in most common lighting scenarios and certainly a cut above your compact digital cameras of old.

As expected we get the warm, well-saturated colours Panasonic is known for, as well as plenty of detail captured right into the corners of the frame – at least when there’s plenty of light around. If detail softens at maximum zoom that is only to be expected, especially when shooting handheld, but again results are better than we’ve seen elsewhere from similar products and will certainly satisfy those wanting a record of sunny summer holidays.

If we’ve a grumble, however, it’s that this isn’t perhaps a camera for shooting in very low light, especially if handheld, as we discovered on our travels, whereby the effects of camera shake are obvious. The fact that the ISO range tops out at a modest selectable ISO3200 at least means that the worst effects of image noise are avoided – we’d advise shooting up to ISO1600, however and leaving it at that, if you want to avoid a noticeable softening and degradation of the image entirely. Twenty megapixels is quite a lot to cram onto a 1/2.3-inch sensor – it’s probably the most you’d want to – so inevitably something has to give.

Overall though, we were pretty happy with the shots we got from the Panasonic Lumix TZ95, particularly given the limitations outlined above. But then we were unusually blessed with plenty of spring sunshine...

Noise

There are 8 ISO settings available on the Panasonic Lumix TZ95. Here are some 100% crops which show the noise levels for each ISO setting.

JPEG RAW

ISO 80 (100% Crop)

ISO 80 (100% Crop)

iso80.jpg iso80raw.jpg

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

ISO 100 (100% Crop)

iso100.jpg iso100raw.jpg

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

ISO 200 (100% Crop)

iso200.jpg iso200raw.jpg

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

ISO 400 (100% Crop)

iso400.jpg iso400raw.jpg

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

ISO 800 (100% Crop)

iso800.jpg iso800raw.jpg

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

ISO 1600 (100% Crop)

iso1600.jpg iso1600raw.jpg

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

ISO 3200 (100% Crop)

iso3200.jpg iso3200raw.jpg

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

ISO 6400 (100% Crop)

iso6400.jpg iso6400raw.jpg

Focal Range

The Panasonic Lumix TZ95's 30x zoom lens provides a very versatile focal length of 24-720mm in 35mm terms, as demonstrated below.

24mm

focal_range1.jpg

720mm

focal_range2.jpg

Chromatic Aberrations

The Panasonic Lumix TZ95 handled chromatic aberrations well during the review, with just a little purple fringing present around the edges of objects in certain high-contrast situations, as shown in the examples below.

Chromatic Aberrations (100% Crop)

chromatic1.jpg

Macro

The Panasonic Lumix TZ95 offers a Macro setting that allows you to focus on a subject that is 3cms away from the camera when the lens is set to wide-angle.

Macro

macro.jpg

Flash

The flash settings on the Panasonic Lumix TZ95 are Auto, Auto/Red-eye Reduction, Forced On, Slow Sync./Red-eye Reduction, Forced Off. These shots of a white coloured wall were taken at a distance of 1.5m.

Forced Off - Wide Angle (24mm)

ISO 64

Forced On - Wide Angle (24mm)

ISO 64

Forced Off - Telephoto (720mm)

ISO 64

Forced On - Telephoto (720mm)

ISO 64

And here are some portrait shots.

Flash On

flash_on.jpg

Redeye Reduction

flash_red_eye.jpg

Night

The Panasonic Lumix TZ95's maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds, which is great news if you're seriously interested in night photography. The shot below was taken using a shutter speed of 4 seconds at ISO 80. The camera takes the same amount of time again to apply noise reduction, so for example at the 15 second setting the actual exposure takes 30 seconds.

Night

night.jpg